Creating good feng shui for your home will be easy when you start with AYRIAL Feng Shui to learn the basics of classical feng shui. AYRIAL will provide inspiring, amusing and enlightening feng shui tips every day from Viviana Estrada. Viviana is a certified feng shui practitioner who studied in Asia and in the USA with recognized Chinese metaphysics masters including Joey Yap, founder and master trainer of the Mastery Academy of Chinese Metaphysics, Vincent Koh, founder of the Singapore Feng Shui Centre, and Lillian Too, founder and Grand Master at the Lillian Too’s Institute of Feng Shui.
To bring good vibes to your space, you might want to consider purging unwanted items from your bedroom. "If you store objects from your past or present that you do not associate with beneficial emotional memories or energetic frequencies, it could negatively influence your aura (energy field), dreams, emotions, and thoughts on a subconscious level," cautions Cerrano.
Despite the common misconception, feng shui is about so much more than simply how things are arranged in a room (though placement certainly plays an important role). And when thinking about the bedroom, it’s important to keep in mind its role as an inner sanctum of sorts. “According to feng shui principles, a master bedroom should be a private place reserved for rest and romance only,” says Olmstead.
Anjie Cho is the founder of Holistic Spaces and Anjie Cho Architect, integrating beauty, spirituality and green design. She creates and enhances balance and harmony by designing spaces with an understanding of sustainability and informed by the ancient practice of feng shui. Her focus is to create a nurturing and supportive environment for each of her clients. Anjie is a registered New York State Architect, Interior Designer, LEED Accredited Professional, and certified Feng Shui consultant. For over 14 years, she has been creating beautiful and nourishing environments. A graduate in Architecture from the University of California at Berkeley, Anjie is a sought-after expert in the fields of feng shui and green design.
To truly feng shui your bedroom, look to the ceiling as well. “We try to avoid sleeping under a sloping ceiling or under beams,” says Los. She explains that sloped ceilings create an uneven distribution of energy in the room, which gets pushed down onto the bed. "It’s like a drip of water dropping on you overnight, and you end up feeling oppressed. It’s very subtle, but a lot of these things are subtle."
Most of us have televisions in our bedroom. It happens. If you have trouble sleeping it or even if you don’t, it is a good idea to cover the television when not in use. The active energy of the television as well as the electronic aspect of it may be disruptive to the type of calming quiet energy more conducive to sleep and bedrooms. My suggestion, find a beautiful scarf or fabric and just toss it over the television!
The number 4 symbolizes stability and a strong foundation, and it represents the four directions and the four seasons. The number 4 is sometimes considered unlucky in Chinese Feng Shui because it sounds like the word "death" in certain Chinese dialects, but it doesn’t have this association for Western cultures. If you have a number four in your address and you are from a country other than China, instead of worrying whether the number four is unlucky, try thinking of four as sounding like the word "more."

Refrain from positioning your bed directly under a beam. A beam may create feelings of pressure that can disrupt your sleep. If you have no other options, cover the beam with fabric or hang 2 bamboo flutes from the beam with the mouthpieces pointed downward. This will help block some of the unwanted energy coming from above the bed. The idea is that you don't want to feel threatened in your sleep.


Charvatova, I., Klokocnik, J., Kolmas, J., & Kostelecky, J. (2011). Chinese tombs oriented by a compass: Evidence from paleomagnetic changes versus the age of tombs. Studia Geophysica Et Geodaetica, 55(1), 159–74. doi:10.1007/s11200-011-0009-2. Abstract: "Extant written records indicate that knowledge of an ancient type of compass in China is very old – dating back to before the Han dynasty (206 BC – 220 AD) to at least the 4th century BC. Geomancy (feng shui) was practised for a long time (for millennia) and had a profound influence on the face of China's landscape and city plans. The tombs (pyramids) near the former Chinese capital cities of Xi'an and Luoyang (together with their suburban fields and roads) show strong spatial orientations, sometimes along a basic south–north axis (relative to the geographic pole), but usually with deviations of several degrees to the East or West. The use of the compass means that the needle was directed towards the actual magnetic pole at the time of construction, or last reconstruction, of the respective tomb. However the magnetic pole, relative to the nearly 'fixed' geographic pole, shifts significantly over time. By matching paleomagnetic observations with modeled paleomagnetic history we have identified the date of pyramid construction in central China with the orientation relative to the magnetic pole positions at the respective time of construction. As in Mesoamerica, where according to the Fuson hypothesis the Olmecs and Maya oriented their ceremonial buildings and pyramids using a compass even before the Chinese, here in central China the same technique may have been used. We found a good agreement of trends between the paleodeclinations observed from tomb alignments and the available global geomagnetic field model CALS7K.2."
The new house you just bought can be a feng shui disaster. You can save yourself a lot of grief, loss and misfortune in years to come. You will be living in the house quite a long time, hopefully for a lifetime. So you must look for a good feng shui house that helps you pile up wealth and nurture great relationships and brings you health, happiness and vitality. 
If you’ve ever had a chat with a real estate agent about dated house fixtures in tacky gold finish, they will tell you that these houses are much loved by most Asian buyers. I’ve had clients who lived in such houses, and even though they hated the fixtures they feared changing them because that would be bad feng shui. The only bad feng shui was actually keeping those dated fixtures!
Hello, I have a question about your article: “Feng Shui Tips for Money”. Your article says to replace any broken items in your home. We live in a rented apartment and the landlord did not do the usual fix-ups when the former tenants moved out. We moved in with the blinds broken in all four window, cracked closet doors, the door frame to the master bedroom is broken and won’t stay shut when closed (you can simply push the door open when “closed”, you don’t need to use the door knob to open/close the door), bathroom tiles messed up such that you have a hard time opening/closing the door and the closet inside the bathroom, problems with plumbing and the stove and refrigerator…crayola marks everywhere, cigarette burns in the carpets and you get the idea here. The apartment was in such a poor state, we refused to give the landlord a deposit unless we could do a walk-through with him and get it in writing about all the broken and poor conditions of everything. He had a fit and would not do it. We’ve been living here since late August, 2015. He finally fixed the plumbing issues and our heater. But that’s all he fixed. We are not responsible for any of the other things, so how would your Feng Shui tips to repair broken things in the home really apply in our situation? What would be a “work around” for NOT doing repairs to a rented apartment, when they were already there when we moved into the unit? Also, about the citrine in the windowsill.. we have four large windows, each with a windowsill. Do I put a piece of citrine in just one of them or in all four? If in only one windowsill, which one? Kitchen, living room, master bedroom (this is being used as our temple/cat room) – or in our bedroom?
The tree loves light, but not direct sunlight, and the air humidity must be of a minimum of 60%, this is why the leaves need to be spayed in case the air in the room is dry. It needs to be watered once per week in order to maintain the soil wet and to remove the excess of the water from the plate. In winter, if the room temperature is below 18º C, the watering needs to be decreased.
The feng shui consultant recognizes that it's not always possible to leave the under-bed area completely clutter-free: "If you do need to store items under the bed, be mindful of who gave these items to you and what emotional content you associate with them." She adds that some items—specifically bedding, clothing, and towels—are better to store under the bed than others. A small number of books is also acceptable, as long as their titles and content are positive.
Leaving the bathroom door open will affect the air quality of your bedroom. For instance, if you just finished “taking care of business”, and you left the bathroom door open, the smell can easily travel to your bedroom, which can significantly affect how fast you fall asleep. Worse, if you have mold in your bathroom, your may be suffering from health problems such as muscle and joint pain, headaches, shortness of breathe, sinus problems, and more.
Boost your career with a better desk position. Position your desk cater-corner to and facing the office or cube door (even if you don’t actually have a door in your workspace). If you can’t turn your desk to face the door, arrange a mirror on your desk or wall so you can see who’s coming. This adjustment helps you encounter more opportunities, go further in your field, and lose less often.
Nature is the ultimate manifestation of unlimited wealth and abundance, so replicating the lush energy of nature in your home will help you attract the same quality of energy. Money plant or not, lucky bamboo or not, know that decorating your home with lush, verdant happy plants in good looking, solid pots is an excellent feng shui wealth magnet. The East, the Southeast, and the South areas are the most greenery loving feng shui areas in your home.
Electronics, such as your smartphone or alarm clock, are great human inventions. It tells you the current time and give you your friend’s Facebook status updates. However, most of us are addicted to our smartphones, and staring at this artificial light before bed is wrecking your sleep. Remove them from easy-access, and you can find your sleep quality improve.
Interesting bits of historical Feng Shui confirmation are starting to emerge. For example, recent scientific research indicates that 28,000 years ago, Neanderthal cavemen (located in present-day Croatia) chose which caves to live in based on three criteria: The caves held the high ground in the area, the surrounding area was easily seen from the entrance of the cave, and the water source was easily accessible. These findings show that even our ancestors were naturally aware of the effects of placement in their environment. Interestingly enough, all three of these criteria are in harmony with the basic principles of Feng Shui, which has evolved and become more sophisticated along with humankind. Thus, Feng Shui is as relevant and beneficial to humankind today as it was 28,000 years ago.
If you share a house with roommates or little ones, a lock on the door is critical for making your room a love nest! Your bedroom is the place where you want to feel most secure and relaxed. The last thing you want is to be constantly worried about a surprise visit. Sound dampening creates a more intimate space as well; items such as an upholstered headboard, curtains, and rugs all contribute to a feeling of privacy and seclusion.
The stage magician duo Penn and Teller dedicated an episode of their Bullshit! television show to criticise the construal of contemporary practice of Feng Shui in the Western World as science. In this episode, they devised a test in which the same dwelling was visited by five different Feng Shui consultants, all five producing different opinions about said dwelling, by which means it was attempted to show there is no consistency in the professional practice of Feng Shui.

In a practical world, televisions and laptops are often a necessary evil in your sacred bedroom space. It's impossible to get away from technology, so a compromise solution is to place your TV in an armoire or another cabinet that can be closed when you're finished watching TV for the night. Close your laptop when not being used and store inside a nightstand or drawer. That way, they are at least out of sight and your space while you rest.
However, do NOT place your bed directly facing the door (in the same alignment as the door) as this is believed in to be the position of the dead ("to go feet first"). It is also best to avoid placing your bed directly underneath a beam or a window. The window will deprive you of the feeling of security we all need when we sleep, and the beam will have a "cutting" effect. If something cuts you from above, you will feel subconsciously threatened by it.
I decided to implement every single big-payoff tip to see what would happen. I put a cool-looking symbol under my bed that was supposed to bring me a husband (nope), did a ceremonial orange peel water sprinkling around my house to create good fortune (couldn’t tell the difference) and buried coins in rice in a big vase to bring money (also, no dice). I couldn’t understand why this stuff didn’t work for me.
Landscape ecologists often find traditional feng shui an interesting study.[45] In many cases, the only remaining patches of old forest in Asia are "feng shui woods",[46] associated with cultural heritage, historical continuity, and the preservation of various flora and fauna species.[47] Some researchers interpret the presence of these woods as indicators that the "healthy homes",[48] sustainability[49] and environmental components of ancient feng shui should not be easily dismissed.[50][51]
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