Decluttering must be thorough—simply hiding your stuff won’t cut it. Items under the furniture, overloaded bookcases and closets, and outdated or broken items all affect chi flow. It’s time to clear out closets, the space under the bed and all cabinets and shelves. Keep only the items you love—or ones that have special meaning—and discard or donate the old and unused.
"You should always be able to control the level of light in your bedroom," Brophy says. She recommends having lights on a dimmer, so you can have exactly as much or as little light as you want. "Lighting has such an effect on our moods and energy. I tell people to buy a few different kind of light bulbs and test them out," she says. "See what kind of light works best for you."

In a practical world, televisions and laptops are often a necessary evil in your sacred bedroom space. It's impossible to get away from technology, so a compromise solution is to place your TV in an armoire or another cabinet that can be closed when you're finished watching TV for the night. Close your laptop when not being used and store inside a nightstand or drawer. That way, they are at least out of sight and your space while you rest.


Feng shui or fengshui (traditional Chinese: 風水; simplified Chinese: 风水, pronounced [fə́ŋ.ʂwèi] (listen)), also known as Chinese geomancy, is a pseudoscience originating from China, which claims to use energy forces to harmonize individuals with their surrounding environment.[1] The term feng shui literally translates as "wind-water" in English. This is a cultural shorthand taken from the passage of the now-lost Classic of Burial recorded in Guo Pu's commentary:[2] Feng shui is one of the Five Arts of Chinese Metaphysics, classified as physiognomy (observation of appearances through formulas and calculations). The feng shui practice discusses architecture in terms of "invisible forces" that bind the universe, earth, and humanity together, known as qi.
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