According to feng shui expert, Rodika Tchi, Chi is manifested in yin yang characteristics, or the idea that our universe is made up of two opposing yet deeply interconnected forces of Yin and Yang. It is important to identify sources of imbalance and create once again the right amount for those that occupy a particular space and also for the space's original purpose. For example, a bedroom should be a place of rest and not of entertainment - at least not of electronic entertainment anyway - and there are specific feng shui guidelines you can follow to ensure this.
Use real fountains in and out of the home, no matter how small, as a powerful feng shui cure. This will attract wealth energy and fresh Chi. You can also use symbols that represent fountains, such as images of flowing water like waterfalls, oceans, and rivers. The water images that have plenty of foam and open views are especially powerful in the feng shui wealth applications.
As you'd probably expect, your headboard and bed frame play a significant role in optimizing the feng shui of your bedroom, according to Cerrano. Choose "a solid wooden headboard and frame," she suggests. This "is a common suggestion in Western feng shui because the element of wood relates to the symbolic nature of supporting your body and energy when sleeping," she explains.
You are in complete control of the lights in your bedroom. However, you have little or no control of the lights outside of your home. That is why you need blinds and curtains that can completely block out the light from the outside. If your current blinds or curtains have light shining through the cracks at night, it may be worthy to invest in double layered curtains to improve your sleep sleep.

Interesting bits of historical Feng Shui confirmation are starting to emerge. For example, recent scientific research indicates that 28,000 years ago, Neanderthal cavemen (located in present-day Croatia) chose which caves to live in based on three criteria: The caves held the high ground in the area, the surrounding area was easily seen from the entrance of the cave, and the water source was easily accessible. These findings show that even our ancestors were naturally aware of the effects of placement in their environment. Interestingly enough, all three of these criteria are in harmony with the basic principles of Feng Shui, which has evolved and become more sophisticated along with humankind. Thus, Feng Shui is as relevant and beneficial to humankind today as it was 28,000 years ago.
Positioning furniture or adding enhancing objects, such as a water fountain or a lively aquarium, increases the good chi in the space. A feng shui "remedy," an object like a mirror, plant, string of lucky Chinese coins, or bamboo flute, "fixes" or deflects bad chi from an inauspicious environment or awkward corner. It's that simple -- and that complicated. Feng shui has rules, but it is an interpretive art. Successful designs for attracting positive energy are influenced by many factors and varying approaches.
Landscape ecologists often find traditional feng shui an interesting study.[45] In many cases, the only remaining patches of old forest in Asia are "feng shui woods",[46] associated with cultural heritage, historical continuity, and the preservation of various flora and fauna species.[47] Some researchers interpret the presence of these woods as indicators that the "healthy homes",[48] sustainability[49] and environmental components of ancient feng shui should not be easily dismissed.[50][51]
Closing the window also cancels out the noise from the outside, which is especially important if you live in the cities where you can hear the rumbles of automobile or noise from human chatter. As previously mentioned, the slightest noise can disrupt the quality of your sleep. If you happen to live in a noisy neighborhood or close to main streets, you might want to invest in double-paned windows.

You'll also want to consult a Bagua map to see what elements to pull into your space. Locate what Bagua your bedroom is located in relationship to the front door of your house, and add accessories accordingly. For example, if your bedroom falls in the Health and Family area, where the dominant element is wood, try to incorporate greens and blues in order to sustain that element.
Think back to your twin bed or futon in college. Would you still want to be sleeping in it? We didn’t think so. Cho says getting a full or queen size bed is ideal for feng shui because it fosters a restful night of sleep and lets chi circulate properly beneath it. It also creates a sense of togetherness between you and your partner (or future partner!). By comparison, twin beds can feel constricted and impermanent, whereas king size beds can be too spacious to promote intimacy. Plus, going oversized often means split box springs under the mattress, which can create disharmony, not to mention cause issues with your back, Cho says.
This practice speaks more to everyday habits than layout or décor, but Cerrano stresses that it's nonetheless important: "Making your bed may seem small and insignificant, yet a greater development within your conscious and subconscious minds is evolving. This simple act becomes your first accomplishment of the day and it only requires two minutes of your time. This also creates a mind-set of being organised, which helps reduce stress and increase motivation. It’s also a means of self-respect, because it means you've taken the time to prepare your bed for sleep as your mom or dad may have done during childhood. It's a little slice of self-love."
As of 2013 the Yangshao and Hongshan cultures provide the earliest known evidence for the use of feng shui. Until the invention of the magnetic compass, feng shui apparently relied on astronomy to find correlations between humans and the universe.[3] In 4000 BC, the doors of Banpo dwellings aligned with the asterism Yingshi just after the winter solstice—this sited the homes for solar gain.[4] During the Zhou era, Yingshi was known as Ding and used to indicate the appropriate time to build a capital city, according to the Shijing. The late Yangshao site at Dadiwan (c. 3500–3000 BC) includes a palace-like building (F901) at the center. The building faces south and borders a large plaza. It stands on a north–south axis with another building that apparently housed communal activities. Regional communities may have used the complex.[5]
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