"It's believed that mirrors have the ability to activate the energy within a room. Clients I work with will sometimes choose to keep a mirror in their bedroom and tell me that they sleep soundly. Others will negotiate the principle and remove extra mirrors and still keep one while being mindful of what it reflects. Some clients love the idea of no mirrors in the bedroom or may just place a long mirror inside the closet door. If you do that, just make sure the closet is organised because mirrors double what they project. The most important thing is to test and measure this feng shui insight because every person is different. Find what works for you."
Nightstands aren't just to create “love” in your life. I don’t care if you want to live alone forever; two nightstands create a more supported and balanced bed for everyone. Look at a bed with one nightstand. It feels off-kilter. If you want to have — or do have — a relationship, two nightstands, if nothing else, signal that you want another person to feel more comfortable in your space as well. These nightstands do not need to match, and they don’t need to be traditional nightstands: chairs, stools, benches and card tables can work in this regard.

4. Declutter. From a feng shui perspective, clutter symbolizes unfinished business and impedes forward progress. Keep your furnishings to only the necessary pieces and keep clutter contained to allow chi to flow freely around the room. Clutter under your bed has its own type of energy that can disturb your sleep as well. This “less is more” approach applies to your closet too. Make sure your closet is clean and organized, which will help you give you a sense of control over your life. Add plants in the corners of your space to help prevent energy from stagnating there.


Starting with the two baguas (why there are two baguas in feng shui and which one is better?) to very different answers you’ll get to the same question; I understand why feng shui is often equated to a new age distraction and something a serious person would not even look into. However, here is the thing — serious people do look into it, and they do get results. I have many clients who are anything but new age junkies and they achieved great results by applying feng shui.
When it comes to getting a good night's sleep, we'll readily admit that there are very few things we won't try. From lowering our thermostats to upgrading our mattresses, we've spilled a lot of ink on strategies for getting solid shut-eye. But as it turns out, optimizing our beds' feng shui could be one of the simpler ways of ensuring we get a restful night's sleep.
Boost your career with a better desk position. Position your desk cater-corner to and facing the office or cube door (even if you don’t actually have a door in your workspace). If you can’t turn your desk to face the door, arrange a mirror on your desk or wall so you can see who’s coming. This adjustment helps you encounter more opportunities, go further in your field, and lose less often.
THE people at Hovnanian Enterprises, a leading suburban homebuilder, figured they had heard every possible objection to a house. Too cramped. Not enough bathrooms. Too close to in-laws. Too far from in-laws. Then, a couple of years ago, a couple said their house must face south. Another said they couldn't live in a house where the interior staircase was aligned with the front door. One customer loved a house, but the unlucky numeral 4 in the address was a deal-breaker.
The Five Elements or Forces (wu xing) – which, according to the Chinese, are metal, earth, fire, water, and wood – are first mentioned in Chinese literature in a chapter of the classic Book of History. They play a very important part in Chinese thought: ‘elements’ meaning generally not so much the actual substances as the forces essential to human life.[32] Earth is a buffer, or an equilibrium achieved when the polarities cancel each other.[citation needed] While the goal of Chinese medicine is to balance yin and yang in the body, the goal of feng shui has been described as aligning a city, site, building, or object with yin-yang force fields.[33]
Charvatova, I., Klokocnik, J., Kolmas, J., & Kostelecky, J. (2011). Chinese tombs oriented by a compass: Evidence from paleomagnetic changes versus the age of tombs. Studia Geophysica Et Geodaetica, 55(1), 159–74. doi:10.1007/s11200-011-0009-2. Abstract: "Extant written records indicate that knowledge of an ancient type of compass in China is very old – dating back to before the Han dynasty (206 BC – 220 AD) to at least the 4th century BC. Geomancy (feng shui) was practised for a long time (for millennia) and had a profound influence on the face of China's landscape and city plans. The tombs (pyramids) near the former Chinese capital cities of Xi'an and Luoyang (together with their suburban fields and roads) show strong spatial orientations, sometimes along a basic south–north axis (relative to the geographic pole), but usually with deviations of several degrees to the East or West. The use of the compass means that the needle was directed towards the actual magnetic pole at the time of construction, or last reconstruction, of the respective tomb. However the magnetic pole, relative to the nearly 'fixed' geographic pole, shifts significantly over time. By matching paleomagnetic observations with modeled paleomagnetic history we have identified the date of pyramid construction in central China with the orientation relative to the magnetic pole positions at the respective time of construction. As in Mesoamerica, where according to the Fuson hypothesis the Olmecs and Maya oriented their ceremonial buildings and pyramids using a compass even before the Chinese, here in central China the same technique may have been used. We found a good agreement of trends between the paleodeclinations observed from tomb alignments and the available global geomagnetic field model CALS7K.2."
Feng shui or fengshui (traditional Chinese: 風水; simplified Chinese: 风水, pronounced [fə́ŋ.ʂwèi] (listen)), also known as Chinese geomancy, is a pseudoscience originating from China, which claims to use energy forces to harmonize individuals with their surrounding environment.[1] The term feng shui literally translates as "wind-water" in English. This is a cultural shorthand taken from the passage of the now-lost Classic of Burial recorded in Guo Pu's commentary:[2] Feng shui is one of the Five Arts of Chinese Metaphysics, classified as physiognomy (observation of appearances through formulas and calculations). The feng shui practice discusses architecture in terms of "invisible forces" that bind the universe, earth, and humanity together, known as qi.
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