The association of the energy of water with wealth is obvious, very ancient and present in all cultures. Fountains are the most popular feng shui for wealth cure,  so if you love fountains, find one (or more) good quality fountains and place them in the best feng shui areas of your home (either inside or outside). I adore this water bell fountain by Woodstock, a classic by now and absolutely the best feng shui fountain I ever experienced! Be sure not to place a fountain in your bedroom – this is not good feng shui.
Traditional feng shui relies upon the compass to give accurate readings.[61][62] However, critics point out that the compass degrees are often inaccurate as fluctuations caused by solar winds have the ability to greatly disturb the electromagnetic field of the earth.[63] Determining a property or site location based upon Magnetic North will result in inaccuracies because true magnetic north fluctuates.[64]
Similar to meditation, the practice of feng shui is deeply steeped in mindfulness, in slowing down and noticing the details in your life so that you can truly experience the present moment. The words "feng shui" are Chinese and translate to "wind" and "water." Wind is our breath, and humans are almost 60 percent water. Wind and water are vital elements for life, as is feng shui! Historically, feng shui has roots in Taoism and Buddhism. However, elements of feng shui are palpable in every culture across time. For instance, these days we can all feel the difference between a New York City apartment and a quiet hidden cabin in the forest, and we understand that our surroundings greatly affect our energy.
Creating good feng shui for your home will be easy when you start with AYRIAL Feng Shui to learn the basics of classical feng shui. AYRIAL will provide inspiring, amusing and enlightening feng shui tips every day from Viviana Estrada. Viviana is a certified feng shui practitioner who studied in Asia and in the USA with recognized Chinese metaphysics masters including Joey Yap, founder and master trainer of the Mastery Academy of Chinese Metaphysics, Vincent Koh, founder of the Singapore Feng Shui Centre, and Lillian Too, founder and Grand Master at the Lillian Too’s Institute of Feng Shui.

If there are areas or objects in your home that are collecting dust, it may symbolize areas of your life that are stagnant and ignored. If you don’t need that object, maybe it’s time to donate it. And if there’s a room you haven’t stepped foot in, maybe it’s time to peek inside. It can be as simple as taking the time to move things around to stir up some good energy.
Curb appeal isn't just for selling a home. Clean up the yard and dispose of limbs, leaves, and other debris. Make sure pathways and walkways to the front door are clean and accessible. Repeat for all other entryways into your home. Trim overgrown shrubbery or replace older ones that are too big. If a tree is directly in front of a door, counter it with a wind chime.
Whether you’re on a Marie Kondo-inspired cleaning kick or made a New Year’s resolution to focus on self care, the bedroom is a great place to focus that fresh-start energy. While decluttering is always an excellent way to begin, it may also be time to feng shui your bedroom, which will not only leave it looking nicer but may also help you sleep better.
In feng shui, it's said that mirrors in front of the bed invite a third person into the marriage. Mirrors are also thought to reflect energy around a space, which could disrupt your sleep. If you do need to have a mirror, make sure it's facing something that you love looking at. (This may seem like common sense, but it's something a lot of us forget about!)

Aim for equality. Try to have equal space on either side of your bed and other furniture. A person should be able to walk around as easily around one side of the room as the other, within reason. Of course, a piece of furniture may add some inequality, but in general, you should avoid letting most of the stuff in the bedroom clutter over to one side, or you'll create discord in your most important room.

"The front door is very important in feng shui," says Benko. After all, it's the main portal through which energy enters your home, remember? From the outside, she suggests "think of the chi as a first-time visitor trying to find your home—you want to make sure it's clearly lit, well-marked, and the address visible." On the inside, you want to make sure you're not walking directly into a wall—"it can metaphorically make you feel like you're up against a wall every day," she says.
Feng Shui is the ancient Chinese system of natural laws which are supposed to govern the spatial arrangement orientation of your furniture and décor in relation to the flow of energy (Chi). The word ‘feng’ is Chinese for wind, and the word ‘shui’ is Chinese for water – together these symbolise the flow of life that one should aspire to have in one’s home.

In itself, feng shui is composed of many schools. It started with the Landscape School (which studies the landforms and their influence on human health and well-being) and then branched out into many different schools — the Flying Star (Xuan Kong), the Eight Mansions (East/West), the Four Pillars (Ba Zhi), and other schools. Basically, various feng shui schools deal with either the time or the space dimensions (or both). The youngest feng shui school is the Western school based on the BTB (Black Sect Tibetan Tantric Buddhism) school of feng shui brought to the USA in mid-eighties.

The Book of Burial says that burial takes advantage of "vital qi". Wu Yuanyin[25] (Qing dynasty) said that vital qi was "congealed qi", which is the state of qi that engenders life. The goal of feng shui is to take advantage of vital qi by appropriate siting of graves and structures.[22] Some people destroyed graveyards of their enemies to weaken their qi.[26][27][28][29][30]
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