Because your bed is the biggest (hopefully!) and the most important piece of furniture in your bedroom, it is very important to follow a good feng shui bedroom layout. Positioning your bed in the best feng shui spot for your bedroom will create better energy in your space, and you will be the one to benefit from it! How do you find the best feng shui spot in your bedroom? Does it require a lot of guessing work or are there good feng shui bedroom layouts that you can just follow in any bedroom?
This means that if you want to stay healthy, happy, enjoy love and success, your space has to support and nourish this energy. It has to be well suited for your personal energy, as well as the energy you want to attract and cultivate. Just like being in a company of a happy person makes your own energy happy, the same happens with your living (or working) space. If your space has good feng shui vibes — healthy, uplifting, loving and nourishing, you will feel supported and happy. Everything will flow easier for you just because this is the energy you are surrounded by and nourished most often.
My bagua number is 1 and I have to sleep in the west area of my home. South is my best direction. Please can you tell me what I can do to lessen the effects of the west area in 2017. My walls are cream, side tables are cream, and my bedspread is silver grey. I do have difficulty having a restful sleep and often wake up several times in the night. Please will you advise. The TV is covered overnight.

"The front door is very important in feng shui," says Benko. After all, it's the main portal through which energy enters your home, remember? From the outside, she suggests "think of the chi as a first-time visitor trying to find your home—you want to make sure it's clearly lit, well-marked, and the address visible." On the inside, you want to make sure you're not walking directly into a wall—"it can metaphorically make you feel like you're up against a wall every day," she says.


The same is true with slanted or sloped ceilings. Though the feeling is very subtle, it does give you some sort of unease or feelings of being compressed (worse for claustrophobics), and those feelings carry over whenever you go to bed. This is especially true if you sleep on the side with the lower ceiling. An easy solution is to use a canopy bed. The four pillars that surround you while you sleep have the tendency to make you feel more “supported” from the downward pressure of the ceiling.
Having a rug to further ground the energy of the bed (and the whole bedroom) brings even more strength to this powerful feng shui bedroom layout. Notice that the other large piece of furniture – a big chest of drawers, an armoire, etc –  is not on the side, but rather at the foot of the bed. This is very important if you want to keep the energy in your bedroom balanced. Now, of course, I know that not all bedrooms are that easy to deal with and there are many details that can prevent you from re-creating this exact feng shui bedroom layout.

So, the point I am emphasizing here is that for anything you bring into your home to work as a feng shui wealth cure  (or any other cure, for that matter), the item has to have a strong energy connection to you, and not to what other people say. If you do not like something, guess what – it does not like you back! Hardly a good feng shui energy dynamic. Next feng shui wealth color is purple and, just like with gold color, you can bring it with a variety of decor items. From painting to pillows, rugs or big book covers – see if this wealth feng shui color can be genuinely welcomed into your home. Use both colors tastefully and wisely, meaning create simple beauty and decorate with objects that you really like – this is how they will start working for you as intended.
A bedroom is no place for an office. A creative corner, maybe, but a technology-filled, deadline-driven, endless to-do list office? A constant reminder of your unread inbox does not cultivate rest or intimacy. Consider a mobile office that partners a laptop with your dining room table (and attractive storage for all your supplies) before you resort to a bedroom office.
Sight: As I mentioned before, Earthy tones are really what you want to be seeing in the bedroom. Fiery tones (reds, pinks, and oranges) can also be nice in moderation. Again, these accents should always be presented in pairs. In my bedroom, you'll find a pair of small pink Mandarin ducks—a traditional Chinese symbol. I love these because the story goes that the ducks were always faithful to each other. Find accents like this that speak to you.
When you see the homes of wealthy people, the number one thing that you actually see is open space. An abundance of open space. Strange, no? Rarely do you see wealthy houses full to the brim with all sorts of stuff. It is the luxury of open space and plenty of breathing room that attracts more wealth energy. In feng shui terms this basically means there is open space to allow more and to enjoy more. To create more, explore more and be more.
too long a list. if u follow every bit written here, you will literally go insane. what i know is that our human brains acclimatise to our surroundings. I was once in africa where noise was always a problem including bedrooms that broke all the laws you hav elisted here. I had a problem sleeping the irst few weeks but I finally got used to it coz i had no where else to go. If the brain realises that there is no solution BI can tell u from experience that it will take on anything.
Anjie Cho is the founder of Holistic Spaces and Anjie Cho Architect, integrating beauty, spirituality and green design. She creates and enhances balance and harmony by designing spaces with an understanding of sustainability and informed by the ancient practice of feng shui. Her focus is to create a nurturing and supportive environment for each of her clients. Anjie is a registered New York State Architect, Interior Designer, LEED Accredited Professional, and certified Feng Shui consultant. For over 14 years, she has been creating beautiful and nourishing environments. A graduate in Architecture from the University of California at Berkeley, Anjie is a sought-after expert in the fields of feng shui and green design.

While we’re in the entry area, let’s activate your front door. The front door is literally and metaphorically how energy walks into your home. On an auspicious day like your birthday or a new moon, between the hours of 11 a.m. and 1 p.m. (the most yang hours of the day), write a list of nine wishes for yourself using a newly purchased black pen on a sheet of red paper. Read your list out loud, and then with respect, mindfully sign the list. Carefully fold the sheet and place it in a red envelope. Securely position your intentions and aspirations above the front door, on the inside of your home. Now, every time you walk through your front door, you are invoking the energy of these wishes so they may manifest in your life. (Note: You can also use this for your bedroom door if you live with roommates.)
If you're going to have mirrors in the bedroom, Brophy recommends avoiding hanging them across from the bed or across from windows. "Mirrors reflect energy and light," Brophy says. "Being able to see your reflection while you're in bed can be distracting. And if you hang a mirror across from a window, it will reflect light and may make it more difficult for you to sleep soundly."
Define the Bagua, or the feng shui energy map, of your house, by using one of the two main feng shui methods: the classical school Bagua or the BTB grid. Once you define the Bagua, you will know which areas of your home are connected to specific areas of your life. For example, in traditional feng shui, the Southeast feng shui area of your home is connected to the flow of money energy in your life.

Think of your bedroom as an oasis. Your bedroom should be your sanctuary. It should be an escape from the stress of your everyday life, whether those include your work, your children, your health, or your friendships. It should not be a place where you throw all of the extra things you have no place for. On the contrary, it should be your oasis in the middle of a desert, a place you can come to when you want to rest -- or just when you need a break.[5]
I’ve read conflicting information of the best body alignment during sleep. I would like to start following Feng Shui and am incorporating what I’ve read in my BR layout. How should one align his or her body during sleep? Head facing the North pole (or avoiding that direction)? Also if I “must” have a mirror in the BR, ok to cover it during sleep? Thanks!
If you look for it, Benko says, "symbolism is constantly bombarding us on an everyday basis. From literature to traffic signage to movies, we're always being guided by symbolism. In our homes, it's enhanced even more, because we are creating these intimate environments that most often represent our fears and challenges." Often, we unwittingly reinforce the challenges in our lives by having their symbols in our space.
In Taoist and feng shui theory, yin and yang are opposites that are dependent upon one another and which must always be in balance. The principle of duality—the idea that all things are balanced blends of two things—is at the root of yin/yang theory. While most other spiritual philosophies believe in opposing dualities, such as good vs. evil, the Chinese Taoist system believes that balance and equilibrium between opposites is the desirable state. Discord occurs when one principle outweighs the other. 
Feng shui or fengshui (traditional Chinese: 風水; simplified Chinese: 风水, pronounced [fə́ŋ.ʂwèi] (listen)), also known as Chinese geomancy, is a pseudoscience originating from China, which claims to use energy forces to harmonize individuals with their surrounding environment.[1] The term feng shui literally translates as "wind-water" in English. This is a cultural shorthand taken from the passage of the now-lost Classic of Burial recorded in Guo Pu's commentary:[2] Feng shui is one of the Five Arts of Chinese Metaphysics, classified as physiognomy (observation of appearances through formulas and calculations). The feng shui practice discusses architecture in terms of "invisible forces" that bind the universe, earth, and humanity together, known as qi.
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