What if rejuvenating your life was as simple as moving a few things around? According to the ancient Chinese art of feng shui (pronounced "fung shway"), it is. Based on the idea that your living space reflects your life, feng shui strives to achieve balance in both. Feng shui holds that all objects possess an energy called chi, and that you can use this chi to bring luck, wealth, and opportunity into your home. "With feng shui, you don't have to spend 20 years on the couch [with a therapist] to change your life – you just have to move the couch," says Ellen Whitehurst, author of Make This Your Lucky Day: Fun and Easy Secrets and Shortcuts to Success, Romance, Health, and Harmony (Random House, January 2008). Try these ten tips to get that energy flowing.
2. Position your bed. In feng shui, the commanding position for your bed is as far away from the door as possible while still allowing you to keep an eye on the room’s entrance. This allows for a feeling of safety and protection while you rest. Try not to position your bed under the lower angle of a pitched ceiling or a ceiling fan. These features have a “depressing” energy that will literally push you down while you sleep. Also, be sure to avoid positioning your bed under a window because it lacks the symbolic support and protection of a solid wall. Headboards, especially those made of solid wood, are considered good feng shui because they provide the added strength and support you need behind your head.

Whether you're looking for balance and harmony in your home, office or diet, feng shui is the latest (by Western standards, anyway) miracle cure for all that ails you. But, in fact, the concept of "chi," the energy that feng shui strives to balance, can be traced to Taoism, a Chinese philosophy that dates back to the sixth century B.C. The Taoist belief asserts that human language is incapable of ex­plaining our existence in the world. Chi is a power beyond the physical world.
Kathryn Weber has over 20+ years of feng shui study, practice and professional consultation. Her witty, no-nonsense style appeals to audiences, making her a popular speaker and radio show guest. She is often called on by media to explain feng shui in down-to-earth terms, and has been featured in Seventeen, First for Women, Faces, Conceive, Martial Arts Professional, and Natural Health magazines, and on websites around the world. Learn More
You can compare a good feng shui house to a piece of clothing that is really wonderful in all aspects — it is beautiful, comfortable, made of exquisite materials, etc. By the same token, a bad feng shui house is like wearing ill-suited clothing day in, day out, imagine how this feels! It definitely makes you feel restricted, unhappy, angry, and your energy becomes stagnant and blocked. The reason I use the example with clothing is because your home is often called the third skin in feng shui, with clothing being your second skin.
Feng shui (pronounced fung shway) is an ancient Chinese knowledge that originated 6,000 years ago. It explains how the placement of objects affects the energy flow in your home, and by extension your personal energy flow. Feng shui takes the approach that your surroundings affect not just your level of material comfort, but also your physical and mental health, relationships and success.

If you have even one leak – anywhere in or around your house – stop reading this blog post and fix it now. In feng shui – and in life – water is wealth: a water leak is both literally and figuratively a leak of precious resources. That’s why fixing leaks will help you save and retain money, rather than watching it flow out just as soon as it flows in.
Bright lights rev up energy. If you're trying to keep energy costs down, then place high-wattage bulbs in the hallways, and lower-wattage bulbs in the rest of the house. "Hallways represent the meridians; the brighter the wattage, the more clean and clear your veins and arteries are," says Whitehurst. Want to light up internally? Place objects around your house that elicit positive emotions and lift your own personal chi. If a particular item makes you feel giddy, put it in a place where it's easy to see.
Stand inside your home with your back to the front door.* Look forward. The part of your home in the far left corner is the money sector. The far right corner is the relationship zone. Got it? You work the magic by placing certain items in certain zones; some have symbolic power, others a literal connection to the area. The eight-point system is intricate and layered; feng shui expert Catherine Brophy shares her best feng shui tips for making every room in your house feel calm and happy.
Always be mindful of the energy in your home and how it influences your wellbeing. Make a habit of paying close attention to the so-called feng shui "trinity" that is deeply connected to your health: your bedroom, your bathroom, and your kitchen. Nothing is static in the world of energy, so you must remain mindful of their condition and effects. Embrace and promote the right energies for you to keep your home healthy and happy.
Feng Shui is the ancient Chinese system of natural laws which are supposed to govern the spatial arrangement orientation of your furniture and décor in relation to the flow of energy (Chi). The word ‘feng’ is Chinese for wind, and the word ‘shui’ is Chinese for water – together these symbolise the flow of life that one should aspire to have in one’s home.
Having grounding and balanced energy on both sides of the bed is very important for a good feng shui bed placement. This means you have to have two nightstands (not one), but it doesn't mean they have to match! Be as creative as you feel like and let your imagination soar, but be sure that your bed has access from both sides and is treated well with two similar pieces of furniture on both sides of the bed.
Is it okay if my head faces the door? The foot of my bed doesn’t face anything, and my head of the bed is against the wall where behind it is my main entrance door to the home. I have both sides of the bed free (not against a wall, but on one side, there’s the bedroom door, the other side, the window. When I open my bedroom door, there is about 2-3 feet of space to my the bed, idk if it’s still good or bad feng shui? Thank you!
For instance, if your bed is under a window and you can’t move it, hang a faceted crystal ball 9 units (inches, cm, etc) from the ceiling in front of the window. What about exposed beams? A Chinese bamboo flute hung on a beam transforms negative energy into positive. You can use the 9 minor additions to fix negative Feng Shui, energize certain sections of your house, and improve the flow of Ch’i.
If you’ve ever had a chat with a real estate agent about dated house fixtures in tacky gold finish, they will tell you that these houses are much loved by most Asian buyers. I’ve had clients who lived in such houses, and even though they hated the fixtures they feared changing them because that would be bad feng shui. The only bad feng shui was actually keeping those dated fixtures!
1. Use calming colors. The practitioners of feng shui recommend warm, rich earth tones such as copper, coral, cream, and cocoa for creating a cozy and welcoming atmosphere. Using soft, natural colors such as light blues, greens, and lavenders also lead to a quiet, tranquil, and inviting energy in your bedroom. The addition of bright pinks and reds can increase the romance in a relationship; however, limit these colors to accents in the form of pillows, throws, or decorative pieces. Use a softer pinks for your bedding or wall color. Otherwise, it can be too overwhelming.

We live in a rented apartment ( floor plan attached). Request if you could please advise if any corrections are required. The main door faces North West and the master bedroom is the one attached to the small balcony. We use the servant room as our pooja room. The Children sleep in the 11*12 bedroom. The placing of all the furniture is very similar to the floor plan image.


So what is feng shui? “Feng shui (pronounced fung shway) is a design system for arranging your surroundings in harmony and balance with the natural world around you,” explains Carol M. Olmstead, FSIA, feng shui master practitioner at Feng Shui for Real Life. “Your surroundings have a powerful effect on what you attract into your life. When the energy around you is blocked, your prosperity, relationships, health, and well-being can be affected. When the energy is balanced, good things naturally flow into your life.”
IF you noticed them at all, you would think they were part of the restaurant's new design: two small octagons outside, each with a mirror at its center. The point? To protect the restaurant from the building across the street, whose sharp edges, according to Judith Wendell, a feng shui consultant, ''create a knifelike effect on the restaurant's energy, cutting into it -- so we're reflecting it back.'' Yes, it's come to this. Opening a restaurant in New York has always required a certain combination of savvy and insanity, especially at problematic addresses. Everyone can think of a space that has had a run of bad luck, no matter how many menus were tried. So when Joy Pierson and Bart Potenza, the owners of Candle Cafe, a successful vegan restaurant at 1307 Third Avenue at 75th Street, decided to expand into the property recently vacated by the failed Dining Room, they took its karma into their own hands. They hired Ms. Wendell to go where no contractor had gone before and fix what seemed to be ailing the two-story town house at 154 East 79th Street at Lexington Avenue.
We need help with abundance cures. We get a little ahead, and then something always happens to put us back behind. This is a rental house that had much negative energy when we moved in. We seem to have taken care of that, but the lack of abundance remains. We spend most of our time on the screened in back porch, some in the fireplace room, and none in the living room. https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/dddd967a29fce3473360756ae5ae92f56206d76355694a3b0360746cb922f471.jpg
One of the most important things in laying out your bedroom is to leave equal room on both sides of the bed. "This is symbolic of creating equal space for both you and your partner," explains feng shui expert Laura Cerrano. "Sometimes the dimensions of a bedroom don't allow for this arrangement, so holding the intention of creating space is essential. Even if you could only spare an inch of space between the wall and bed, it's better than nothing. Besides that, having two side tables and lamps is a great go-to general recommendation because it relates to balance." If not for feng shui reasons, we also think symmetry looks better.
Landscape ecologists often find traditional feng shui an interesting study.[45] In many cases, the only remaining patches of old forest in Asia are "feng shui woods",[46] associated with cultural heritage, historical continuity, and the preservation of various flora and fauna species.[47] Some researchers interpret the presence of these woods as indicators that the "healthy homes",[48] sustainability[49] and environmental components of ancient feng shui should not be easily dismissed.[50][51]
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