Design tweaks include reducing the numbers of mirrors on the wall, and positioning beds away from facing the door—both concessions to feng shui (the former bounces energy, creating restlessness; the latter is the position of the dead). — Mark Ellwood, Condé Nast Traveler, "How Chinese Tourists Are Changing the Travel Landscape," 2 Nov. 2018 My own perception of feng shui revolts against the number of doors—that many egress routes can’t be restful. — Alexandra Lange, Curbed, "A museum grows in Houston," 1 Nov. 2018 The life coach starts with a decluttering exercise followed by a feng shui session before ending with the blessing. — Katie Jackson, Fox News, "What is a house blessing and should you have one?," 1 Mar. 2017 The manicured grounds, which include two outdoor fireplaces, fountain features and a koi pond, were done by landscape architect Mark Rios and feng shui consultant David Cho. — Neal J. Leitereg, latimes.com, "'West Wing' star Rob Lowe seeks $47 million for empty nest in Montecito," 30 June 2018 More from Mansion The Lowes bought the land in 2005, records show, and built the home from scratch, hiring a feng shui master to help create a peaceful atmosphere. — Katherine Clarke, WSJ, "Rob Lowe Asks $47 Million for California Estate," 22 June 2018 Most of the companies still using their downtown outposts have figured out that feng shui. — Ally Marotti, chicagotribune.com, "Suburban companies battle tech giants for talent. Downtown office spaces are their secret weapon.," 21 June 2018 La Volpe was impressed with Camacho’s expertise in history and feng shui, the Chinese practice of harmonizing human surroundings with the natural world. — Raúl Vilchis, New York Times, "Mexico Wages a Psychological Battle Against Its World Cup Demons," 6 June 2018 The grand archway on Nelson Street is said to have been built according to the principles of feng shui, thus bringing good luck. — The Economist, "Europe’s oldest Chinatown fights for survival," 31 May 2018

Charvatova, I., Klokocnik, J., Kolmas, J., & Kostelecky, J. (2011). Chinese tombs oriented by a compass: Evidence from paleomagnetic changes versus the age of tombs. Studia Geophysica Et Geodaetica, 55(1), 159–74. doi:10.1007/s11200-011-0009-2. Abstract: "Extant written records indicate that knowledge of an ancient type of compass in China is very old – dating back to before the Han dynasty (206 BC – 220 AD) to at least the 4th century BC. Geomancy (feng shui) was practised for a long time (for millennia) and had a profound influence on the face of China's landscape and city plans. The tombs (pyramids) near the former Chinese capital cities of Xi'an and Luoyang (together with their suburban fields and roads) show strong spatial orientations, sometimes along a basic south–north axis (relative to the geographic pole), but usually with deviations of several degrees to the East or West. The use of the compass means that the needle was directed towards the actual magnetic pole at the time of construction, or last reconstruction, of the respective tomb. However the magnetic pole, relative to the nearly 'fixed' geographic pole, shifts significantly over time. By matching paleomagnetic observations with modeled paleomagnetic history we have identified the date of pyramid construction in central China with the orientation relative to the magnetic pole positions at the respective time of construction. As in Mesoamerica, where according to the Fuson hypothesis the Olmecs and Maya oriented their ceremonial buildings and pyramids using a compass even before the Chinese, here in central China the same technique may have been used. We found a good agreement of trends between the paleodeclinations observed from tomb alignments and the available global geomagnetic field model CALS7K.2."
Feng shui or fengshui (traditional Chinese: 風水; simplified Chinese: 风水, pronounced [fə́ŋ.ʂwèi] (listen)), also known as Chinese geomancy, is a science originating from China, which claims to use energy forces to harmonize individuals with their surrounding environment.[1] The term feng shui literally translates as "wind-water" in English. This is a cultural shorthand taken from the passage of the now-lost Classic of Burial recorded in Guo Pu's commentary:[2] Feng shui is one of the Five Arts of Chinese Metaphysics, classified as physiognomy (observation of appearances through formulas and calculations). The feng shui practice discusses architecture in terms of "invisible forces" that bind the universe, earth, and humanity together, known as qi.
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