Sometimes the simplest tips are the best. Simply clearing your clutter increases your confidence, which in turn gives your success and prosperity a generous boost. Additionally, letting go of what you don’t actually want creates plenty of space for what you do want. In other words, you create an energy vacuum into which wealth and resources instantly and naturally begin to flow. (Overwhelmed? Here are some places to start.)
Everyone appreciates the benefits of beautiful, comfortable living environments; America’s billion-dollar interior decorating industry attests to this fact. However, Feng Shui takes the approach that your surroundings affect not just your level of material comfort but also your physical and mental health, your relationships, and your worldly success.
The Golden Rooster or the Red Rooster is a lucky element for those who want to obtain a promotion. On the other hand, it is beneficial when placed in the office because it balances the energies, it improves communication and it helps to establish new contacts and relationships. Chinese people like to decorate it with lucky coins and to place it in the north or south side of the office.
The southeast sector is the wealth sector and can be activated by good luck charms and feng shui cures. Stimulate it by adding the element of wood, like a jade plant, or a symbol of wealth, like three Chinese coins tied together with a red ribbon. A three-legged toad with a Chinese coin in its mouth is also an auspicious symbol of wealth. A water feature will feed the wood element and stimulate a growth in wealth. Be sure the water flows into the home and not away.
This applies mostly to adults and not students, because the adults are the ones who get more pressure from work due to the need to support the family and the kids. The easy cure to this is to remove the desk or other furnitures that remind you of work. Here’s a tip I got from Hipster Feng Shui. If you live in a small space, you can try dividing your work area and your bed with a curtain.

Polarity is expressed in feng shui as yin and yang theory. Polarity expressed through yin and yang is similar to a magnetic dipole. That is, it is of two parts: one creating an exertion and one receiving the exertion. Yang acting and yin receiving could be considered an early understanding of chirality.[clarification needed] The development of this theory and its corollary, five phase theory (five element theory), have also been linked with astronomical observations of sunspots.[31]

A bedroom is no place for an office. A creative corner, maybe, but a technology-filled, deadline-driven, endless to-do list office? A constant reminder of your unread inbox does not cultivate rest or intimacy. Consider a mobile office that partners a laptop with your dining room table (and attractive storage for all your supplies) before you resort to a bedroom office.
The most famous feng shui wealth fish is the arowana, or dragon fish, and the purest arowanas are known to command quite high fees. However, the koi, or gold fish, are just as effective, as well as a pleasure to look at. Go for 8 or 9 fish, one of them being black color. Aquariums are auspicious because they bring a harmonious combination of several wealth attracting feng shui factors. 
To ensure a good night's sleep, be conscious of your bedroom's ceiling as well, suggests Cerrano. "Do you have a ceiling fan, beams, a skylight, an angled or slanted ceiling design?" she asks. "Any of these could negatively affect your sleep and energy as they relate to Sha energy (which drains a person's energy)," Cerrano explains. If your ceiling has any of the aforementioned items, avoid sleeping directly under them, if you can, she suggests.
3. Show off your curves. When choosing bedroom furniture, try to pick pieces with soft lines and curvilinear forms. Square corners have pointed energy and can create a sharp environment. The “poison arrows” formed by right angles are thought to direct negative energy directly to your sleeping form. To create a more “zen” night stand, limit what you place on the surface. Keep it simple with a lamp, a few inspirational books, a picture, and a plant or fresh flowers.
The southeast sector is the wealth sector and can be activated by good luck charms and feng shui cures. Stimulate it by adding the element of wood, like a jade plant, or a symbol of wealth, like three Chinese coins tied together with a red ribbon. A three-legged toad with a Chinese coin in its mouth is also an auspicious symbol of wealth. A water feature will feed the wood element and stimulate a growth in wealth. Be sure the water flows into the home and not away.
Who has not heard of Feng Shui symbols like chinese dragon, laughing buddha or phoenix  ? Some of the feng shui symbols are well known like mandarin ducks or the lucky bamboo. Whether you use feng shui symbols as gift or as an expression of good wishes you must know where to place it. Otherwise they cannot fullfill the great promise of their meaning. 
If you do decide to use crystals, the type of crystal and its placement matters, according to some Feng Shui practitioners. For instance, two rose quartz hearts can be placed in Southwest to promote better relationship. Another popular one is the purple amethyst, which is said to clear negative energies in an area and can be used for the Personal Growth Bagua area of your home.
Hi Victor! The beam in our room is placed in the middle, so there’s no way you can avoid it even if you move the bed, so i made a diy canopy to cover the beam. We’re living in an apartment so we cannot put a false ceiling. Is canopy fine? Also there is a pillar at the back of our headboard, and again, we cant move the bed in any other place coz we only have limited space. What is the best cure for the pillar? Thanks!
If designed right, though, your bedroom has limitless potential. Between those four walls, you can have a sanctuary, a REM fortress, a dream world… This space can also symbolize your relationship with yourself, your partner and the most important things in your life. And feng shui — the ancient Chinese practice of balancing energies in any given space by placing your furniture and belongings a certain way — might help.

Anything in your home, whether it’s a door, sink or stove, that is broken will suck money energy out of your home. The fastest way to heal the energy of your home to attract money is to fix any broken things. The stove and anything related to plumbing are extremely important to keep functioning. When those things aren’t working, you’ll experience a financial clog.
WALKING into Judi Longo's apartment in Chelsea is like sinking into a cloud, all soft and white and light. Candles line the window sills and sit on the kitchen counter. Every piece of furniture is white; even the roses in the living room are white. It hasn't been delivered yet, but soon a white sofa will take its place in the living room. Oddly, it doesn't feel dull at all, but clean and welcoming, much like the new building, 21 Chelsea, on 21st Street between Avenue of the Americas and Seventh Avenue, where she is renting the one-bedroom apartment, on the 12th floor, for $2,750 a month.
Without question, the money is always at the front door. Give your porch and front door area a good cleaning. Is there a broken light bulb or a dying plant? Anything that doesn’t work properly, look auspicious or that’s dirty (like a light fixture with dead bugs in it), will lower your financial energy. Spruce up your front door and walkway. Add a pretty pot of flowers here and keep the porch light on and the area will-lit to invite money and opportunity to your home.
The essence of these life-giving elements is chi, or life force. Wind and water are direct carriers of chi, as their flowing quality reflects their essential nature. All living organisms are largely composed of these two elements. Thus, Feng Shui is the art of designing environments in harmony with the flow of chi through one’s living space, and this flow supports and enhances one’s personal chi or life force.

When you see the homes of wealthy people, the number one thing that you actually see is open space. An abundance of open space. Strange, no? Rarely do you see wealthy houses full to the brim with all sorts of stuff. It is the luxury of open space and plenty of breathing room that attracts more wealth energy. In feng shui terms this basically means there is open space to allow more and to enjoy more. To create more, explore more and be more.
A common place for storage in the bedroom is usually under the bed, but Cerrano believes it's not good practice: "This may not be the most ideal place for extra storage. Why? From a feng shui perspective, storage under the bed can obstruct your sleeping pattern because the movement of energy cannot flow evenly around the energy fields of your bed. For instance, shoes are suggested to be stored in closets because they symbolise other people potentially taking advantage of you."
To bring good vibes to your space, you might want to consider purging unwanted items from your bedroom. "If you store objects from your past or present that you do not associate with beneficial emotional memories or energetic frequencies, it could negatively influence your aura (energy field), dreams, emotions, and thoughts on a subconscious level," cautions Cerrano.

Dana Claudat is a modern feng shui master, designer, and founder of the blog The Tao of Dana. She is a Stanford-educated art historian with more than a decade of experience in design, feng shui, and research with thousands of clients, yet her approach to space is simple. Starting where you are, using what you have, you can create more of your dream home—and dream life—every day. Dana is a longtime mindbodygreen contributor and instructor (she may have had a hand in the hundreds of plants in mindbodygreen headquarters!), and her work has been featured in design and lifestyle publications around the world. You can work with Dana from wherever you are in the world in her online Feng Shui Camps and through her Online Feng Shui Consultations. For more art and feng shui lifestyle inspiration, you can follow Dana on Facebook and Instagram. Join in her weekly feng shui notes, including monthly New Moon Full Moon feng shui rituals, here!


Nightstands aren't just to create “love” in your life. I don’t care if you want to live alone forever; two nightstands create a more supported and balanced bed for everyone. Look at a bed with one nightstand. It feels off-kilter. If you want to have — or do have — a relationship, two nightstands, if nothing else, signal that you want another person to feel more comfortable in your space as well. These nightstands do not need to match, and they don’t need to be traditional nightstands: chairs, stools, benches and card tables can work in this regard.
In a practical world, televisions and laptops are often a necessary evil in your sacred bedroom space. It's impossible to get away from technology, so a compromise solution is to place your TV in an armoire or another cabinet that can be closed when you're finished watching TV for the night. Close your laptop when not being used and store inside a nightstand or drawer. That way, they are at least out of sight and your space while you rest.
Smell: I advise using essential oils in an ultrasonic diffuser or in a candle diffuser (most wax candles these days are packed with synthetic fragrances). Limit it to a few drops of oil in diluted in water, and don't leave them diffusing for more than an hour or two. They are potent! I love lavender and jasmine oils for a calming smell before bed. If I have a cough, I'll go with ravintsara or eucalyptus. Looking to amp up the sexual energy? Check out cinnamon, ylang-ylang, and best of all, winter savory.

"Not a single thing!" Brophy says. Because every item has its own energy, the more stuff that's piled under the bed (even if it's just extra bedding!), the less space there is for your own energy to pass through while you sleep. This can be a tough one, especially if you're lacking in the square footage department, but Brophy swears this is helpful to everyone, and particularly recommends it for people who have difficulty sleeping.
The entry and front door to your home represent the way you face the outside. It’s how the world sees you, like a first impression. Be sure to keep the area clean and clutter-free. This does not mean the entry must be completely empty; rather it’s about keeping only what you need there. So if it’s winter, it makes sense to hang your scarf, hat, and coat there. The interior and exterior entry should also be well lit (get some bright bulbs on a dimmer!). Lastly, be sure your door number is clean, hung straight, and easily visible. Auspicious opportunities need clear signage to find you! In addition, I often recommend a nice black rectangular welcome mat to attract good energy.
Most of us have at least one mirror in the bedroom, if not more, but feng shui experts advise against this. “If possible, remove mirrors from the bedroom, as the reflective energy causes excess energy in the room that can be disruptive to sleep,” says Morris. If a mirror in your room is non-negotiable, there are a few possible workarounds, according to Laura Cerrano, a certified feng shui expert and CEO and founder at Feng Shui Manhattan. She suggests covering the mirror at night or placing the mirror so it is not facing the bed.
Where you place your bed is very important in feng shui. Choose the wrong wall and you risk a long string of restless nights. The path from your bedroom door to the window has the strongest flow of energy; keep your bed out of this path if possible. Positioning your bed in front of a window is a big feng shui no-no. Ideally you should have a solid headboard or wall behind your bed (no diagonal placement either), a small table or chair on either side for support, and a low bench or a trunk at the foot of the bed.

Laura Cerrano’s biggest all-purpose feng shui suggestion is to kill the clutter in every part of your apartment. “No matter if you're a millionaire or if you’re dealing with unemployment, the pitfall everyone falls into is clutter,” she says. “Clutter isn’t just about aesthetics — it’s been proven to be detrimental to your mind, to the neurons in your brain. It creates stress.”
In itself, feng shui is composed of many schools. It started with the Landscape School (which studies the landforms and their influence on human health and well-being) and then branched out into many different schools — the Flying Star (Xuan Kong), the Eight Mansions (East/West), the Four Pillars (Ba Zhi), and other schools. Basically, various feng shui schools deal with either the time or the space dimensions (or both). The youngest feng shui school is the Western school based on the BTB (Black Sect Tibetan Tantric Buddhism) school of feng shui brought to the USA in mid-eighties.

The rooster may be the same as the Rooster King mentioned below (I am not sure, but their uses seem to differ). The rooster has a literal use. The figurine can be used to counter the “Centipede Xa”, symbolizing the rooster devouring the centipede. The “Centipede Xa” comes from power lines or pipes, resembling a centipede, that are visible from your kid’s bedroom (if you have kids) or kitchen window. To cure the Xa, place the rooster figurine facing towards the “centipede” as a cure for this negative Feng Shui energy.
It's important to balance the yin and yang in the bedroom, and one way to do that is by mixing textures, says Cerrano. Yin (the feminine energy) is evident in soft textures like a plush rug or soft blanket and "brings in that mothering, nurturing energy and emotion," she explains. The masculine yang energy, on the other hand, can be found in hard wood floors, for example. However, men can have feminine energies and vice versa, which is why Cerrano suggests balancing hard and soft textures in the bedroom. Los agrees: “Too many bedrooms now are too yang."
Laura Cerrano’s biggest all-purpose feng shui suggestion is to kill the clutter in every part of your apartment. “No matter if you're a millionaire or if you’re dealing with unemployment, the pitfall everyone falls into is clutter,” she says. “Clutter isn’t just about aesthetics — it’s been proven to be detrimental to your mind, to the neurons in your brain. It creates stress.”
Feng Shui practitioners from many cultures believe that displaying objects around your home in specific number combinations can enhance your life and help you attract wealth, harmony, and love. The origins of Feng Shui are Chinese, and the Chinese meaning of a number is often associated with its pronunciation. This means that numbers can be misinterpreted in Western culture if the meaning given to them is based on the way they sound in Chinese.
Partly because of the Cultural Revolution, in today's mainland China less than one-third of the population believe in feng shui, and the proportion of believers among young urban Chinese is said to be much lower[73] Learning feng shui is still somewhat considered taboo in today's China.[74][75][76] Nevertheless, it is reported that feng shui has gained adherents among Communist Party officials according to a BBC Chinese news commentary in 2006,[77] and since the beginning of Chinese economic reforms the number of feng shui practitioners is increasing. A number of Chinese academics permitted to research on the subject of feng shui are anthropologists or architects by profession, studying the history of feng shui or historical feng shui theories behind the design of heritage buildings, such as Cao Dafeng, the Vice-President of Fudan University,[78] and Liu Shenghuan of Tongji University.
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