So what is feng shui and why is it so difficult to understand it? Well, for one, feng shui is a very, very old art and science. Its history goes back thousands of years. That is really, really old, which means really, really easy to misinterpret. Because feng shui is such an ancient body of knowledge, it has also been fully “steeped” in cultural stereotypes. This makes it very important to distinguish between the culturally specific expressions of energy and the very essence of any given form of energy.
Make sure the bed is a good height. To allow for a balanced Feng Shui energy flow under the bed, you need to have your bed at a reasonable height above the floor level. Generally, the beds that have built-in storage drawers underneath to help you with storage solutions are considered bad Feng Shui beds. Why? Because the energy needs to circulate around your body when you sleep, which is not possible if the space underneath the bed is blocked.
To demystify some of the rules of this ancient Chinese tradition, we tapped New York–based professor, feng shui expert, and author of The Holistic Home, Laura Benko to give us simple, actionable tips on how to incorporate its philosophy in our homes. Benko is widely acclaimed for having rebranded feng shui into a more modern, holistic approach while still honoring age-old traditions. To Benko, feng shui is not about transforming the structure of a home, but about making our homes evolve with us. Though nearly imperceptible, these small tweaks can have a "profound impact on your daily life," she insists.
A few years later I found feng shui again, but this time with a new viewpoint: a Western viewpoint, grounded in tradition but also in science, so it made new sense to me. I tried more feng shui tips from this point of view, but this time the tips seemed to have more of a connection to my actual living space and lifestyle. They forced me to readjust myself in my space and see things in a new way.
"The front door is very important in feng shui," says Benko. After all, it's the main portal through which energy enters your home, remember? From the outside, she suggests "think of the chi as a first-time visitor trying to find your home—you want to make sure it's clearly lit, well-marked, and the address visible." On the inside, you want to make sure you're not walking directly into a wall—"it can metaphorically make you feel like you're up against a wall every day," she says.
The head of the bed should be against a wall, but not under a window which could allow qi to flow outside and cause restless sleep. It's best not to place a bed under a structural or decorative beam or ceiling fan either, as this is good for neither physical health nor relationships. If moving your bed isn't an option, feng shui practitioners sometimes recommend hanging a bamboo flute (a special feng shui device) from the beam or fan to offset the effects.

As of 2013 the Yangshao and Hongshan cultures provide the earliest known evidence for the use of feng shui. Until the invention of the magnetic compass, feng shui apparently relied on astronomy to find correlations between humans and the universe.[3] In 4000 BC, the doors of Banpo dwellings aligned with the asterism Yingshi just after the winter solstice—this sited the homes for solar gain.[4] During the Zhou era, Yingshi was known as Ding and used to indicate the appropriate time to build a capital city, according to the Shijing. The late Yangshao site at Dadiwan (c. 3500–3000 BC) includes a palace-like building (F901) at the center. The building faces south and borders a large plaza. It stands on a north–south axis with another building that apparently housed communal activities. Regional communities may have used the complex.[5]

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