Aim for equality. Try to have equal space on either side of your bed and other furniture. A person should be able to walk around as easily around one side of the room as the other, within reason. Of course, a piece of furniture may add some inequality, but in general, you should avoid letting most of the stuff in the bedroom clutter over to one side, or you'll create discord in your most important room.
You might not realize it, but the energy from the things you store underneath your bed can transfer to you, Cho says. That’s why feng shui practitioners advise clearing out the chaos, so energy can flow easily around you while you’re sleeping. “If those things have or represent active energy, like shoes, books or an exercise mat, you can absorb it on a subconscious level.” If you absolutely have to store things there (hello city living!), Cho recommends limiting them to soft items, like bed sheets, linens and pillows.
If you’ve ever had a chat with a real estate agent about dated house fixtures in tacky gold finish, they will tell you that these houses are much loved by most Asian buyers. I’ve had clients who lived in such houses, and even though they hated the fixtures they feared changing them because that would be bad feng shui. The only bad feng shui was actually keeping those dated fixtures!
Nature creates a sense of peace. In fact, research shows that viewing nature reduces anger and anxiety and enhances feelings of pleasure. So flood your home with natural light, open windows and doors to let fresh air inside, and bring plants indoors. Decorate with bamboo, wood, or wicker, and use stones and rocks to add texture. You can also adorn the walls with paintings of nature and its serenity.
The southeast sector is the wealth sector and can be activated by good luck charms and feng shui cures. Stimulate it by adding the element of wood, like a jade plant, or a symbol of wealth, like three Chinese coins tied together with a red ribbon. A three-legged toad with a Chinese coin in its mouth is also an auspicious symbol of wealth. A water feature will feed the wood element and stimulate a growth in wealth. Be sure the water flows into the home and not away.
In feng shui, a cluttered house equals a cluttered mind. Even worse, clutter literally sucks up the energy in a space. "You may think you're hiding your clutter, but the closet has as much of an effect on energy flow as anything else," says Whitehurst. If there's clutter somewhere in your home — even tucked away in an attic — then it's also cluttering your head, as well as the rest of your body.
Westerners were criticized at the start of the anti-Western Boxer Rebellion for violating the basic principles of feng shui in the construction of railroads and other conspicuous public structures throughout China. However, today, feng shui is practiced not only by the Chinese, but also by Westerners and still criticized by Christians around the world. Many modern Christians have an opinion of feng shui similar to that of their predecessors:[79]
Feng shui or fengshui (traditional Chinese: 風水; simplified Chinese: 风水, pronounced [fə́ŋ.ʂwèi] (listen)), also known as Chinese geomancy, is a pseudoscience originating from China, which claims to use energy forces to harmonize individuals with their surrounding environment.[1] The term feng shui literally translates as "wind-water" in English. This is a cultural shorthand taken from the passage of the now-lost Classic of Burial recorded in Guo Pu's commentary:[2] Feng shui is one of the Five Arts of Chinese Metaphysics, classified as physiognomy (observation of appearances through formulas and calculations). The feng shui practice discusses architecture in terms of "invisible forces" that bind the universe, earth, and humanity together, known as qi.
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