To ensure the constant flow of good energy throughout the home, wind (air) and light must move as well. You’ve decluttered your home in step one, making it easier for energy to flow. Now open the windows to increase air flow. Maximize light movement by keeping all glass, mirrors and windows clean. Have a dark corner or space that needs a little brightening? Add a lamp to illuminate the spot, or place a mirror to reflect light from a different spot.
Smell: I advise using essential oils in an ultrasonic diffuser or in a candle diffuser (most wax candles these days are packed with synthetic fragrances). Limit it to a few drops of oil in diluted in water, and don't leave them diffusing for more than an hour or two. They are potent! I love lavender and jasmine oils for a calming smell before bed. If I have a cough, I'll go with ravintsara or eucalyptus. Looking to amp up the sexual energy? Check out cinnamon, ylang-ylang, and best of all, winter savory.
Many people live in homes where they drive up into the garage and use the back door to get in. While this is very convenient, from a Feng Shui perspective this may limit good energy and opportunities in your life because again, the entry door represents how chi enters your home and life. The easy Feng Shui fix? Start using the front door at least once week. The more often the better! Just open and close it when you go get the mail, or maybe to take walk. Write it into your regular routine.
Interesting bits of historical Feng Shui confirmation are starting to emerge. For example, recent scientific research indicates that 28,000 years ago, Neanderthal cavemen (located in present-day Croatia) chose which caves to live in based on three criteria: The caves held the high ground in the area, the surrounding area was easily seen from the entrance of the cave, and the water source was easily accessible. These findings show that even our ancestors were naturally aware of the effects of placement in their environment. Interestingly enough, all three of these criteria are in harmony with the basic principles of Feng Shui, which has evolved and become more sophisticated along with humankind. Thus, Feng Shui is as relevant and beneficial to humankind today as it was 28,000 years ago.
Having a rug to further ground the energy of the bed (and the whole bedroom) brings even more strength to this powerful feng shui bedroom layout. Notice that the other large piece of furniture – a big chest of drawers, an armoire, etc –  is not on the side, but rather at the foot of the bed. This is very important if you want to keep the energy in your bedroom balanced. Now, of course, I know that not all bedrooms are that easy to deal with and there are many details that can prevent you from re-creating this exact feng shui bedroom layout.
Feng shui or fengshui (traditional Chinese: 風水; simplified Chinese: 风水, pronounced [fə́ŋ.ʂwèi] (listen)), also known as Chinese geomancy, is a pseudoscience originating from China, which claims to use energy forces to harmonize individuals with their surrounding environment.[1] The term feng shui literally translates as "wind-water" in English. This is a cultural shorthand taken from the passage of the now-lost Classic of Burial recorded in Guo Pu's commentary:[2] Feng shui is one of the Five Arts of Chinese Metaphysics, classified as physiognomy (observation of appearances through formulas and calculations). The feng shui practice discusses architecture in terms of "invisible forces" that bind the universe, earth, and humanity together, known as qi.
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