It's important to balance the yin and yang in the bedroom, and one way to do that is by mixing textures, says Cerrano. Yin (the feminine energy) is evident in soft textures like a plush rug or soft blanket and "brings in that mothering, nurturing energy and emotion," she explains. The masculine yang energy, on the other hand, can be found in hard wood floors, for example. However, men can have feminine energies and vice versa, which is why Cerrano suggests balancing hard and soft textures in the bedroom. Los agrees: “Too many bedrooms now are too yang."
In Feng Shui art, it is recommended to place green plants in the office. They are valuable for health and work conditions because they bring positive energies and they increase the creative work and the productivity. The best plant for office is bamboo because it brings luck. Place the plants from east to south-east. Avoid cactuses, bonsai and sharp edged leaves plants.
Feng shui literally translates from Chinese as "wind" (feng) and water ("shui"). It's the art of arranging buildings, objects, space and life to achieve harmony and balance. Feng shui works on the assumption that the world is driven by unseen forces. The idea behind it is to "unblock" the way, so the forces may flow freely and create balance in a space (or life).
We have a master bath attached to our bedroom. The only way to place our bed ends up with our feet facing the bathroom wall (not the door itself) It is way too tight of a squeeze to put any furniture at the foot of the bed, and we can’t afford a tall footboard. Even if we could, it would squish my hubby, because his feet almost dangle the way it is. There is a dresser against the wall adjoining the bathroom. I am super superstitious and found this fung shui by accident. Is this horrible luck, even if we keep the bathroom door closed? Everything else that I’ve read (and I’m not reading anymore lol) seems to be good in the bedroom. We can see the bedroom door well, and the head of the bed is not on the same wall with a closet, main door, or window. It also isn’t against the adjoining bathroom wall. It is balanced, and honestly, I love my bedroom. I have just recently started having major insomnia around 3 months ago, but we have lived here for 1.5 years with no issues prior. I’ve actually slept like a baby until this issue began. Thanks!
Sorry, your comment went to spam and I just saw this. Window and bedroom door alignment just means you have a stronger flow of wind coming from your window, if they’re both open. Some may say it’s bad because energy cannot gather (which is what Feng Shui is all about). To remedy, just keep your door and window open at the same time for no more than 2 hours a day. It’s also not too big of a deal if you keep the both open – it just means it’s harder for the bedroom to gather Qi energy from the outside.
Feng shui Fu Dogs, or Imperial Guardian Lions, is a strong feng shui protection symbol. Fu Dogs were traditionally placed in front of Imperial palaces, temples, and government offices. Fu Dogs were also a traditional feng shui symbol of family wealth and social status and were placed in front of wealthy homes. Fu Dogs are usually displayed as a couple. 
This applies mostly to adults and not students, because the adults are the ones who get more pressure from work due to the need to support the family and the kids. The easy cure to this is to remove the desk or other furnitures that remind you of work. Here’s a tip I got from Hipster Feng Shui. If you live in a small space, you can try dividing your work area and your bed with a curtain.
Imperial palaces and cities were planned according to feng shui, which became a principle of classical Chinese architecture. Beijing's Forbidden City is an example. A spectacular complex of palaces, administrative buildings, and temples arranged around a series of courtyards, the Forbidden City was the capital of China during the Ming and Qing dynasties.
Beginning with palatial structures at Erlitou,[10] all capital cities of China followed rules of feng shui for their design and layout. During the Zhou era, the Kaogong ji (simplified Chinese: 考工记; traditional Chinese: 考工記; "Manual of Crafts") codified these rules. The carpenter's manual Lu ban jing (simplified Chinese: 鲁班经; traditional Chinese: 魯班經; "Lu ban's manuscript") codified rules for builders. Graves and tombs also followed rules of feng shui, from Puyang to Mawangdui and beyond. From the earliest records, the structures of the graves and dwellings seem to have followed the same rules.
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