Creating a strong front door is important because your house needs it in order to be able to attract wealth chi. The front door is called the Mouth of Chi in feng shui, and its strength and auspicious energy are important to a good feng shui house. Protect your front door, if necessary, with feng shui symbols of protection, abundance, and good luck.

Define the Bagua, or the feng shui energy map, of your house, by using one of the two main feng shui methods: the classical school Bagua or the BTB grid. Once you define the Bagua, you will know which areas of your home are connected to specific areas of your life. For example, in traditional feng shui, the Southeast feng shui area of your home is connected to the flow of money energy in your life.
If you share a house with roommates or little ones, a lock on the door is critical for making your room a love nest! Your bedroom is the place where you want to feel most secure and relaxed. The last thing you want is to be constantly worried about a surprise visit. Sound dampening creates a more intimate space as well; items such as an upholstered headboard, curtains, and rugs all contribute to a feeling of privacy and seclusion.
Display feng shui symbols in your home that speak to you about wealth and abundance. You can use classical symbols, such as the wealth ship, or your own representation of wealth energy. An obvious color to go with is gold, which represents a strong money correlation. Another color of wealth is purple. You can use these pigments in paintings, pillows, rugs, and other objects around your home and office.

"It's believed that mirrors have the ability to activate the energy within a room. Clients I work with will sometimes choose to keep a mirror in their bedroom and tell me that they sleep soundly. Others will negotiate the principle and remove extra mirrors and still keep one while being mindful of what it reflects. Some clients love the idea of no mirrors in the bedroom or may just place a long mirror inside the closet door. If you do that, just make sure the closet is organised because mirrors double what they project. The most important thing is to test and measure this feng shui insight because every person is different. Find what works for you."
Different schools of feng shui have opposing views on mirrors in the bedroom, but Cho says having round or oval mirrors actually symbolize continuity in a relationship and helps with the flow of chi in the room. Many feng shui experts advise against having a mirror directly in front of your bed because it may cause infidelity in a relationship, and it might also be jarring to see your reflection if you wake up in the middle of the night. Instead, you can position a full-length mirror away from your bed, so that you can see a reflection of the door and who’s entering. Or, stash that looking glass on the inside of your closet door.
Sorry, your comment went to spam and I just saw this. Window and bedroom door alignment just means you have a stronger flow of wind coming from your window, if they’re both open. Some may say it’s bad because energy cannot gather (which is what Feng Shui is all about). To remedy, just keep your door and window open at the same time for no more than 2 hours a day. It’s also not too big of a deal if you keep the both open – it just means it’s harder for the bedroom to gather Qi energy from the outside.

Feng shui literally translates from Chinese as "wind" (feng) and water ("shui"). It's the art of arranging buildings, objects, space and life to achieve harmony and balance. Feng shui works on the assumption that the world is driven by unseen forces. The idea behind it is to "unblock" the way, so the forces may flow freely and create balance in a space (or life).
If placing the wardrobe around the bed on both sides instead of placing it in the wall adjacent to the bed, I wouldn’t put any storage above or below the bed (I would be able to walk around in both sides of the bed too, although the wardrobe will occupy some space, being around 2 feet in depth), there could be built-in nightstands on both sides of the wardrobe and I could also opt for a Murphy bed/wall bed, in which case, when closing the bed, I would have more space in the room to roll out a yoga mat. That’s what I’d prefer to do, but I don’t know if this arrangement would pose any issues. If having the wardrobe around the bed, I would probably still have to build an additional small wardrobe in the left hand side next to a narrow dresser in front of the bed in case I need the extra space.

Getting started with feng shui for your home is easy when you begin with the house basics and gradually move on to the more complex feng shui levels. After you have mastered these seven home feng shui steps, you can explore the deeper levels of feng shui, such as the annual movement of feng shui stars, or energies. The important things to remember are to start simply, have fun, and thoroughly enjoy the process—this is good feng shui.

A colored object placed within the Life Area (of your space) associated with that color can help energize that space. By placing the Feng Shui Octagon, a tool for mapping the energies of a home or lot, over your lot plan or a floor plan of your home (starting with the first floor and then moving to any additional floors), you can figure out which parts of your home fall in which Life Areas and cure them with an appropriately colored object.
Feng shui is sometimes thought to be the art of placement—understanding how the placement of yourself and objects within a space affects your life in various areas of experience. It is a complex body of knowledge that teaches you how to balance and harmonize with the energies in any given space—be it a home, office, or garden. Its aim is to assure good fortune for the people inhabiting a space. Although regarded by some in the scientific community as a pseudo-science, feng shui has had an impact on the aesthetics of interior design and the architectural layout of living and working spaces both in its native eastern and, more recently, western cultures.  
Anjie Cho is the founder of Holistic Spaces and Anjie Cho Architect, integrating beauty, spirituality and green design. She creates and enhances balance and harmony by designing spaces with an understanding of sustainability and informed by the ancient practice of feng shui. Her focus is to create a nurturing and supportive environment for each of her clients. Anjie is a registered New York State Architect, Interior Designer, LEED Accredited Professional, and certified Feng Shui consultant. For over 14 years, she has been creating beautiful and nourishing environments. A graduate in Architecture from the University of California at Berkeley, Anjie is a sought-after expert in the fields of feng shui and green design.
What if rejuvenating your life was as simple as moving a few things around? According to the ancient Chinese art of feng shui (pronounced "fung shway"), it is. Based on the idea that your living space reflects your life, feng shui strives to achieve balance in both. Feng shui holds that all objects possess an energy called chi, and that you can use this chi to bring luck, wealth, and opportunity into your home. "With feng shui, you don't have to spend 20 years on the couch [with a therapist] to change your life – you just have to move the couch," says Ellen Whitehurst, author of Make This Your Lucky Day: Fun and Easy Secrets and Shortcuts to Success, Romance, Health, and Harmony (Random House, January 2008). Try these ten tips to get that energy flowing.
Persecution was the most severe during the Cultural Revolution, when feng shui was classified as a custom under the so-called Four Olds to be wiped out. Feng shui practitioners were beaten and abused by Red Guards and their works burned. After the death of Mao Zedong and the end of the Cultural Revolution, the official attitude became more tolerant but restrictions on feng shui practice are still in place in today's China. It is illegal in the PRC today to register feng shui consultation as a business and similarly advertising feng shui practice is banned. There have been frequent crackdowns on feng shui practitioners on the grounds of "promoting feudalistic superstitions" such as one in Qingdao in early 2006 when the city's business and industrial administration office shut down an art gallery converted into a feng shui practice.[71] Some communist officials who had previously consulted feng shui were terminated and expelled from the Communist Party.[72]
"To further harmonize the energy of your bedroom, keeping it organized and being very selective with the type of objects you bring into it (e.g., images, artwork, colors, textiles) play a collaborative role in enhancing your space," says Cerrano. And if you're looking to expand the good energy into the rest of your space, find out how to achieve a happy and healthy home, according to feng shui, here.
1. Use calming colors. The practitioners of feng shui recommend warm, rich earth tones such as copper, coral, cream, and cocoa for creating a cozy and welcoming atmosphere. Using soft, natural colors such as light blues, greens, and lavenders also lead to a quiet, tranquil, and inviting energy in your bedroom. The addition of bright pinks and reds can increase the romance in a relationship; however, limit these colors to accents in the form of pillows, throws, or decorative pieces. Use a softer pinks for your bedding or wall color. Otherwise, it can be too overwhelming.
Many people get concerned about the bathroom when it comes to Feng Shui. The idea is that the water goes out of the home here. Since water is related to wealth, we don’t want our money being flushed away. I have also been taught that water comes back in as it’s being drained, but to be safe, I recommend that you keep the toilet seat cover down and the bathroom door closed to reduce this effect.
To the uninitiated, feng shui can feel a little esoteric, but if you take the time to dig into the philosophy behind it, you'll find out that it's not only based on simple common-sense practices that make our homes healthier and more organized, but it also reveals how connected we are to our homes—and in turn, how they can affect our mood and well-being. In practicality, feng shui should feel no weirder or less intuitive than spring-cleaning or decorating a comfortable home.

In Feng Shui, we use the “commanding position” to locate important furniture such as your bed. The bed is arguably the most important piece of furniture to put in the commanding position because you spend so many passive hours sleeping! To place your bed in the commanding position, you want to be facing the door while not in line with the door while lying in bed. Ideally you can be diagonally across the room from your bedroom door. However, I understand this is not always possible. In that case, find a mirror and place it so that you can see the door while lying in bed. I suggest freestanding mirrors, as they’re easier to move around and get just right.

The Golden Rooster or the Red Rooster is a lucky element for those who want to obtain a promotion. On the other hand, it is beneficial when placed in the office because it balances the energies, it improves communication and it helps to establish new contacts and relationships. Chinese people like to decorate it with lucky coins and to place it in the north or south side of the office.
4. Declutter. From a feng shui perspective, clutter symbolizes unfinished business and impedes forward progress. Keep your furnishings to only the necessary pieces and keep clutter contained to allow chi to flow freely around the room. Clutter under your bed has its own type of energy that can disturb your sleep as well. This “less is more” approach applies to your closet too. Make sure your closet is clean and organized, which will help you give you a sense of control over your life. Add plants in the corners of your space to help prevent energy from stagnating there.
The bedroom is one of the most important rooms in the home, according to feng shui, because it's where we seek restoration, balance, and peace. It's also the place of dreams. In feng shui, the items you place between your mattresses have an energetic association with your intentions. So yes, you can make money (or find true love) in your sleep. Use sensual fabrics and fluffy pillows to promote relaxation and don't store things under your bed — shoes, suitcases, books, pictures, and files are too energizing for restful slumber.

To maintain the peacefulness of your bedroom, keep it a work-free zone. That means keeping any work-related materials off of your night tables and moving your laptop and phone away from your bed. We know—this can be difficult in today's age of working from home, particularly if you live in a tight apartment. “If you're limited in space and must work in your bedroom, be sure your work area is as far from the bed as possible, and use a screen or plants to hide the area at night,” says Olmstead.
Feng shui is a little like astrology. Whether you actually believe in it (or not), learning its inner workings and understanding how it can impact your everyday life is somewhat fascinating. Whether we're talking new moons and planet alignments or bedroom colors and under-bed storage, the link between environment and energy is an abstract concept—but that doesn't mean that its concrete implications in everyday life need to be confusing as well.

“In feng shui, these trucks just gave off a form of Qi. It is this type of Qi that gives you the edgy feeling when you drive next to it. It is the kind of invisible pressure you feel when you’re right next to a bigger object or within a narrow space. Low ceilings, low hanging chandeliers, and huge furniture also tend to give off this form of Qi, but you will feel it only when you’re right under these objects or very close to it.”
Nonetheless, after Richard Nixon journeyed to the People's Republic of China in 1972, feng shui became marketable in the United States and has since been reinvented by New Age entrepreneurs for Western consumption. Critics of contemporary feng shui are concerned that with the passage of time much of the theory behind it has been lost in translation, not paid proper consideration, frowned upon, or even scorned. Robert T. Carroll sums up what feng shui has become in some instances:
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