The feng shui energy map or bagua is an octagonal grid containing the symbols of the "I Ching," the ancient oracle and text that feng shui is based on. Knowing the bagua (pronounced "bag-wha") of your home and of the rooms within it will help you understand the connection between different areas and specific aspects of your life experience. The bagua is essentially a mapping chart by which you can assess and improve how different parts of the home affect specific areas of your life such as love, health, or wealth. You can use it to determine how to position furniture and other objects within the room for the maximum positive benefit. 
You can compare a good feng shui house to a piece of clothing that is really wonderful in all aspects — it is beautiful, comfortable, made of exquisite materials, etc. By the same token, a bad feng shui house is like wearing ill-suited clothing day in, day out, imagine how this feels! It definitely makes you feel restricted, unhappy, angry, and your energy becomes stagnant and blocked. The reason I use the example with clothing is because your home is often called the third skin in feng shui, with clothing being your second skin.
As of 2013 the Yangshao and Hongshan cultures provide the earliest known evidence for the use of feng shui. Until the invention of the magnetic compass, feng shui apparently relied on astronomy to find correlations between humans and the universe.[3] In 4000 BC, the doors of Banpo dwellings aligned with the asterism Yingshi just after the winter solstice—this sited the homes for solar gain.[4] During the Zhou era, Yingshi was known as Ding and used to indicate the appropriate time to build a capital city, according to the Shijing. The late Yangshao site at Dadiwan (c. 3500–3000 BC) includes a palace-like building (F901) at the center. The building faces south and borders a large plaza. It stands on a north–south axis with another building that apparently housed communal activities. Regional communities may have used the complex.[5]
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