Get rid of your television. Television creates an unhealthy magnetic field which may disrupt your sleep, strain your relationship with your partner or bring a third party into the bedroom. If you have to keep it in the bedroom, then try to cover it with a scarf when you're not using it. If you're really serious about it, hide the TV in the closet when you're not using it, or place it on a shelf that can lock up, hiding the TV when it's not in use.

Speaking of beds, they should always have a headboard. In feng shui, headboards provide a feeling of support in life. If you have a box spring only, you can get a headboard separately, but make sure to attach it very well to the bed. You don’t want it to wobble! When choosing a headboard, go for one that has soft edges whenever possible. Heavy cast-iron headboards or ones that have bars have that same "cutting" energy you're trying to avoid in such a relaxing space. Instead, I recommend ones that are made of fabric, as they provide a soft, inviting feel. Platform beds are great too, but make sure that the platform has no sharp angles where you could hurt your shins.
To the uninitiated, feng shui can feel a little esoteric, but if you take the time to dig into the philosophy behind it, you'll find out that it's not only based on simple common-sense practices that make our homes healthier and more organized, but it also reveals how connected we are to our homes—and in turn, how they can affect our mood and well-being. In practicality, feng shui should feel no weirder or less intuitive than spring-cleaning or decorating a comfortable home.
The oldest examples of instruments used for feng shui are liuren astrolabes, also known as shi. These consist of a lacquered, two-sided board with astronomical sightlines. The earliest examples of liuren astrolabes have been unearthed from tombs that date between 278 BC and 209 BC. Along with divination for Da Liu Ren[17] the boards were commonly used to chart the motion of Taiyi through the nine palaces.[18] The markings on a liuren/shi and the first magnetic compasses are virtually identical.[19]
Broken things have no place in your home. Everyone I know would be upset about a broken car, but they have broken door handles, broken appliances and all sorts of broken architecture everywhere in their living environment. Your space is a mirror of you. Don’t let it stay broken! While fixing things in your home you may find it easier to confront and fix other lingering issues or problems in your life at the same time.
The Chi Lin is a mythical Chinese creature with the head of a Dragon, the body of a Horse, and the scales of a Carp fish. Also called the Dragon Horse, or the Chinese Unicorn, Chi Lin brings strong, protective feng shui energy with blessings of good health and prosperity. Chi Lin is very loyal to its owner and will protect the house from evil spirits. This mythical creature has a higher royal status than other feng shui guardians. 
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4. Ventilate and brighten, in other words encourage good quality air to circulate and let lots of light into your house. These two elements are essential for good chi. Open bedroom windows first thing in the morning to allow moisture to escape (taking care not to leave ground floor rooms unattended for security reasons). And once you’ve exhausted all possible avenues to let in natural light, consider using full-spectrum lighting to further brighten up a space.
A grave at Puyang (around 4000 BC) that contains mosaics— actually a Chinese star map of the Dragon and Tiger asterisms and Beidou (the Big Dipper, Ladle or Bushel)— is oriented along a north–south axis.[6] The presence of both round and square shapes in the Puyang tomb, at Hongshan ceremonial centers and at the late Longshan settlement at Lutaigang,[7] suggests that gaitian cosmography (heaven-round, earth-square) existed in Chinese society long before it appeared in the Zhoubi Suanjing.[8]
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