If you’ve ever had a chat with a real estate agent about dated house fixtures in tacky gold finish, they will tell you that these houses are much loved by most Asian buyers. I’ve had clients who lived in such houses, and even though they hated the fixtures they feared changing them because that would be bad feng shui. The only bad feng shui was actually keeping those dated fixtures!

Feng shui or fengshui (traditional Chinese: 風水; simplified Chinese: 风水, pronounced [fə́ŋ.ʂwèi] (listen)), also known as Chinese geomancy, is a pseudoscience originating from China, which claims to use energy forces to harmonize individuals with their surrounding environment.[1] The term feng shui literally translates as "wind-water" in English. This is a cultural shorthand taken from the passage of the now-lost Classic of Burial recorded in Guo Pu's commentary:[2] Feng shui is one of the Five Arts of Chinese Metaphysics, classified as physiognomy (observation of appearances through formulas and calculations). The feng shui practice discusses architecture in terms of "invisible forces" that bind the universe, earth, and humanity together, known as qi.
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