You can compare a good feng shui house to a piece of clothing that is really wonderful in all aspects — it is beautiful, comfortable, made of exquisite materials, etc. By the same token, a bad feng shui house is like wearing ill-suited clothing day in, day out, imagine how this feels! It definitely makes you feel restricted, unhappy, angry, and your energy becomes stagnant and blocked. The reason I use the example with clothing is because your home is often called the third skin in feng shui, with clothing being your second skin.
The feng shui energy map or bagua is an octagonal grid containing the symbols of the "I Ching," the ancient oracle and text that feng shui is based on. Knowing the bagua (pronounced "bag-wha") of your home and of the rooms within it will help you understand the connection between different areas and specific aspects of your life experience. The bagua is essentially a mapping chart by which you can assess and improve how different parts of the home affect specific areas of your life such as love, health, or wealth. You can use it to determine how to position furniture and other objects within the room for the maximum positive benefit. 
The tree loves light, but not direct sunlight, and the air humidity must be of a minimum of 60%, this is why the leaves need to be spayed in case the air in the room is dry. It needs to be watered once per week in order to maintain the soil wet and to remove the excess of the water from the plate. In winter, if the room temperature is below 18º C, the watering needs to be decreased.
Refrain from positioning your bed directly under a beam. A beam may create feelings of pressure that can disrupt your sleep. If you have no other options, cover the beam with fabric or hang 2 bamboo flutes from the beam with the mouthpieces pointed downward. This will help block some of the unwanted energy coming from above the bed. The idea is that you don't want to feel threatened in your sleep.
Kathryn Weber has over 20+ years of feng shui study, practice and professional consultation. Her witty, no-nonsense style appeals to audiences, making her a popular speaker and radio show guest. She is often called on by media to explain feng shui in down-to-earth terms, and has been featured in Seventeen, First for Women, Faces, Conceive, Martial Arts Professional, and Natural Health magazines, and on websites around the world. Learn More
Books, courses, and online resources are all terrific ways to learn more about feng shui in order to see your own environment with new eyes. A trained feng shui expert can provide in-depth treatment of your space, help in selecting a layout and furnishings, or calculate the best location for a home or business. Add feng shui to your arsenal of strategies for attracting good fortune and avoiding negative energy. The feng shui principles you use to invite positive chi into your life are as timeless as wind and water.
Use your feng shui birth element to help create a home that nourishes and supports your energy. For example, if your birth element is Fire, you can introduce the expressions of the Fire element, such as triangular shapes or the Fire colors: red, orange, purple, magenta, pink, and yellow. You will also want a strong Wood element in your home, as Wood feeds the Fire element in the productive cycle of the five feng shui elements.

Some say that sleeping above the kitchen stove brings bad energy that disturbs sleep and creates health issues. Though I do not disagree with them, what I do know is that your bedroom’s temperature may be higher than normal, caused by the cooking activities and the heat given off from the back of the refrigerator. Because the optimal temperature for sleep is around 65 degrees Fahrenheit, you may be losing on some quality sleep.


In Taoist and feng shui theory, yin and yang are opposites that are dependent upon one another and which must always be in balance. The principle of duality—the idea that all things are balanced blends of two things—is at the root of yin/yang theory. While most other spiritual philosophies believe in opposing dualities, such as good vs. evil, the Chinese Taoist system believes that balance and equilibrium between opposites is the desirable state. Discord occurs when one principle outweighs the other. 
Still others are simply skeptical of feng shui. Evidence for its effectiveness is based primarily upon anecdote and users are often offered conflicting advice from different practitioners. Feng shui practitioners use these differences as evidence of variations in practice or different schools of thought. Critical analysts have described it thus: "Feng shui has always been based upon mere guesswork".[81][82] Some are skeptical of feng shui's lasting impact.[83] Mark Johnson:[84]
The number 4 symbolizes stability and a strong foundation, and it represents the four directions and the four seasons. The number 4 is sometimes considered unlucky in Chinese Feng Shui because it sounds like the word "death" in certain Chinese dialects, but it doesn’t have this association for Western cultures. If you have a number four in your address and you are from a country other than China, instead of worrying whether the number four is unlucky, try thinking of four as sounding like the word "more."
Feng shui or fengshui (traditional Chinese: 風水; simplified Chinese: 风水, pronounced [fə́ŋ.ʂwèi] (listen)), also known as Chinese geomancy, is a pseudoscience originating from China, which claims to use energy forces to harmonize individuals with their surrounding environment.[1] The term feng shui literally translates as "wind-water" in English. This is a cultural shorthand taken from the passage of the now-lost Classic of Burial recorded in Guo Pu's commentary:[2] Feng shui is one of the Five Arts of Chinese Metaphysics, classified as physiognomy (observation of appearances through formulas and calculations). The feng shui practice discusses architecture in terms of "invisible forces" that bind the universe, earth, and humanity together, known as qi.
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