I decided to implement every single big-payoff tip to see what would happen. I put a cool-looking symbol under my bed that was supposed to bring me a husband (nope), did a ceremonial orange peel water sprinkling around my house to create good fortune (couldn’t tell the difference) and buried coins in rice in a big vase to bring money (also, no dice). I couldn’t understand why this stuff didn’t work for me.
A common place for storage in the bedroom is usually under the bed, but Cerrano believes it's not good practice: "This may not be the most ideal place for extra storage. Why? From a feng shui perspective, storage under the bed can obstruct your sleeping pattern because the movement of energy cannot flow evenly around the energy fields of your bed. For instance, shoes are suggested to be stored in closets because they symbolise other people potentially taking advantage of you."
Polarity is expressed in feng shui as yin and yang theory. Polarity expressed through yin and yang is similar to a magnetic dipole. That is, it is of two parts: one creating an exertion and one receiving the exertion. Yang acting and yin receiving could be considered an early understanding of chirality.[clarification needed] The development of this theory and its corollary, five phase theory (five element theory), have also been linked with astronomical observations of sunspots.[31]

Feng shui literally translates from Chinese as "wind" (feng) and water ("shui"). It's the art of arranging buildings, objects, space and life to achieve harmony and balance. Feng shui works on the assumption that the world is driven by unseen forces. The idea behind it is to "unblock" the way, so the forces may flow freely and create balance in a space (or life).


Make sure you have something representing the five elements — wood, earth, metal, fire, and water — in every room. The goal is to stay grounded, centered, and balanced in your life and your environment. For example, place a wooden bowl filled with stone pebbles alongside a candle and a vase of flowers. Or try to incorporate colors that symbolize the five elements:
The idea, says Benko, is to strike a balance between all elements. "A lot of times, people are drawn to elements that they either need more of, or that's a great cause of imbalance in their lives." For instance, people having issues with aggression should be mindful of not having too much fire elements as part of their decor, like a bright red wall. Conversely, personality types lacking motivation should infuse more of the fire element in their homes to give them a boost. 
3. For a personalised Feng Shui Consultation go to my contact us page. Here you will find a questionaire with a lot of questions. Dont worry, these are "yes" or "no" questions. All you have to do is tick the right option. And then I can give you feng shui tips personalised to your home. You can find the contact us page at the top of my website. Or simply click here
1. Use calming colors. The practitioners of feng shui recommend warm, rich earth tones such as copper, coral, cream, and cocoa for creating a cozy and welcoming atmosphere. Using soft, natural colors such as light blues, greens, and lavenders also lead to a quiet, tranquil, and inviting energy in your bedroom. The addition of bright pinks and reds can increase the romance in a relationship; however, limit these colors to accents in the form of pillows, throws, or decorative pieces. Use a softer pinks for your bedding or wall color. Otherwise, it can be too overwhelming.
And then there’s the pillow situation. A welcoming bed has soft blankets and enough pillows for two people. Piling on too many pillows makes your bed feel too crowded and cluttered, according to feng shui experts. Finding the right kind of pillow will depend largely on your sleep position. For example, if you sleep on your back, you’ll want to get a thin pillow to support your neck. (Going too thick will throw it out of alignment).
Have inspiring art in your bedroom. Hang up images of calming scenes from nature, or other places that inspire you. Pick some neutral scenery, an image that motivates you to achieve your dreams, or something else that puts you in a calm and peaceful frame of mind. Anything too graphic, gory or just disturbing does not belong in your bedroom. Place the most inspiring image across from your line of sight in the bed, so that it's the first thing you see when you wake up.[7]

It's important to balance the yin and yang in the bedroom, and one way to do that is by mixing textures, says Cerrano. Yin (the feminine energy) is evident in soft textures like a plush rug or soft blanket and "brings in that mothering, nurturing energy and emotion," she explains. The masculine yang energy, on the other hand, can be found in hard wood floors, for example. However, men can have feminine energies and vice versa, which is why Cerrano suggests balancing hard and soft textures in the bedroom. Los agrees: “Too many bedrooms now are too yang."

The main door to the room or space is called the "mouth of chi," and it's thought to be the portal through which energy comes into your home and life. When you are cooking at the stove (or sleeping in bed, or sitting at your desk), it’s best if you can see the door but not be directly in line with it. It's best to be diagonal from the door, while still facing it. Understandably, this is not always possible, so you can make adjustments like placing a mirror such that you can see the door in the reflection while cooking at the stove (or sleeping in bed, or sitting at your desk). If that’s still not doable, you can use a faceted feng shui crystal ball and hang it between the door and the object.


Since energy enters through the main portal (read: your front door), you don't want to have it shoot straight up the stairs, says the feng shui expert. Remember how you envisioned the chi as a guest? When you invite a visitor into your home, it would be weird for them to head straight to the fridge or the bedroom, right? Instead, you want them to linger in the common area. 
Benko says there is a slew of emotional issues constantly being displayed in her clients' homes. "Do you have trouble getting clarity? Check if you have stuff all over your surfaces. Do you have self-esteem issues? Check if your mirrors are hung too high, so you can never measure up. Are you chronically single? Assess if you're loading up your home with single imagery—a single vase, a single chair, a single person in a picture."

Laura Cerrano’s biggest all-purpose feng shui suggestion is to kill the clutter in every part of your apartment. “No matter if you're a millionaire or if you’re dealing with unemployment, the pitfall everyone falls into is clutter,” she says. “Clutter isn’t just about aesthetics — it’s been proven to be detrimental to your mind, to the neurons in your brain. It creates stress.”
A grave at Puyang (around 4000 BC) that contains mosaics— actually a Chinese star map of the Dragon and Tiger asterisms and Beidou (the Big Dipper, Ladle or Bushel)— is oriented along a north–south axis.[6] The presence of both round and square shapes in the Puyang tomb, at Hongshan ceremonial centers and at the late Longshan settlement at Lutaigang,[7] suggests that gaitian cosmography (heaven-round, earth-square) existed in Chinese society long before it appeared in the Zhoubi Suanjing.[8]
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