So what is feng shui and why is it so difficult to understand it? Well, for one, feng shui is a very, very old art and science. Its history goes back thousands of years. That is really, really old, which means really, really easy to misinterpret. Because feng shui is such an ancient body of knowledge, it has also been fully “steeped” in cultural stereotypes. This makes it very important to distinguish between the culturally specific expressions of energy and the very essence of any given form of energy.
Since ancient times, the wise Chinese believed that amethyst, a purple crystal, can facilitate the professional relationships with the superiors, as well as with the field experts. It is recommended to place a tree made out of amethyst stones in the office, where it can balance the energies between colleagues and leaders, which, at the right time, will lead to a promotion.
Despite the common misconception, feng shui is about so much more than simply how things are arranged in a room (though placement certainly plays an important role). And when thinking about the bedroom, it’s important to keep in mind its role as an inner sanctum of sorts. “According to feng shui principles, a master bedroom should be a private place reserved for rest and romance only,” says Olmstead.
The entry and front door to your home represent the way you face the outside. It’s how the world sees you, like a first impression. Be sure to keep the area clean and clutter-free. This does not mean the entry must be completely empty; rather it’s about keeping only what you need there. So if it’s winter, it makes sense to hang your scarf, hat, and coat there. The interior and exterior entry should also be well lit (get some bright bulbs on a dimmer!). Lastly, be sure your door number is clean, hung straight, and easily visible. Auspicious opportunities need clear signage to find you! In addition, I often recommend a nice black rectangular welcome mat to attract good energy.
If you’ve ever had a chat with a real estate agent about dated house fixtures in tacky gold finish, they will tell you that these houses are much loved by most Asian buyers. I’ve had clients who lived in such houses, and even though they hated the fixtures they feared changing them because that would be bad feng shui. The only bad feng shui was actually keeping those dated fixtures!
1. Use calming colors. The practitioners of feng shui recommend warm, rich earth tones such as copper, coral, cream, and cocoa for creating a cozy and welcoming atmosphere. Using soft, natural colors such as light blues, greens, and lavenders also lead to a quiet, tranquil, and inviting energy in your bedroom. The addition of bright pinks and reds can increase the romance in a relationship; however, limit these colors to accents in the form of pillows, throws, or decorative pieces. Use a softer pinks for your bedding or wall color. Otherwise, it can be too overwhelming.

The Book of Burial says that burial takes advantage of "vital qi". Wu Yuanyin[25] (Qing dynasty) said that vital qi was "congealed qi", which is the state of qi that engenders life. The goal of feng shui is to take advantage of vital qi by appropriate siting of graves and structures.[22] Some people destroyed graveyards of their enemies to weaken their qi.[26][27][28][29][30]

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