Where you place your bed is very important in feng shui. Choose the wrong wall and you risk a long string of restless nights. The path from your bedroom door to the window has the strongest flow of energy; keep your bed out of this path if possible. Positioning your bed in front of a window is a big feng shui no-no. Ideally you should have a solid headboard or wall behind your bed (no diagonal placement either), a small table or chair on either side for support, and a low bench or a trunk at the foot of the bed.
Feng Shui is a term composed of two Chinese words: feng (wind) and shui (water). Wind and water are the two natural elements that flow, move, and circulate everywhere on Earth. They are also the most basic elements required for human survival. Wind — or air — is the breath of life; without it, we would die in moments. And water is the liquid of life; without it, we would die in days. The combined qualities of wind and water determine the climate, which historically has determined our food supply and in turn affects our lifestyle, health, energy, and mood. These two fundamental and flowing elements have always profoundly yet subtly influenced human individuals and societies.
The feng shui energy map or bagua is an octagonal grid containing the symbols of the "I Ching," the ancient oracle and text that feng shui is based on. Knowing the bagua (pronounced "bag-wha") of your home and of the rooms within it will help you understand the connection between different areas and specific aspects of your life experience. The bagua is essentially a mapping chart by which you can assess and improve how different parts of the home affect specific areas of your life such as love, health, or wealth. You can use it to determine how to position furniture and other objects within the room for the maximum positive benefit. 

While we’re in the entry area, let’s activate your front door. The front door is literally and metaphorically how energy walks into your home. On an auspicious day like your birthday or a new moon, between the hours of 11 a.m. and 1 p.m. (the most yang hours of the day), write a list of nine wishes for yourself using a newly purchased black pen on a sheet of red paper. Read your list out loud, and then with respect, mindfully sign the list. Carefully fold the sheet and place it in a red envelope. Securely position your intentions and aspirations above the front door, on the inside of your home. Now, every time you walk through your front door, you are invoking the energy of these wishes so they may manifest in your life. (Note: You can also use this for your bedroom door if you live with roommates.)
Despite the common misconception, feng shui is about so much more than simply how things are arranged in a room (though placement certainly plays an important role). And when thinking about the bedroom, it’s important to keep in mind its role as an inner sanctum of sorts. “According to feng shui principles, a master bedroom should be a private place reserved for rest and romance only,” says Olmstead.
When you see the homes of wealthy people, the number one thing that you actually see is open space. An abundance of open space. Strange, no? Rarely do you see wealthy houses full to the brim with all sorts of stuff. It is the luxury of open space and plenty of breathing room that attracts more wealth energy. In feng shui terms this basically means there is open space to allow more and to enjoy more. To create more, explore more and be more.
By now, it's commonly known (although widely ignored) that TVs, phones, and other electronics are causing us to get less sleep. But Cerrano takes it a step further, warning against electromagnetic fields (EMFs) from tech devices in the bedroom, especially if someone is ill or hyper-sensitive. She even advises turning off the wifi before going to bed, as it "can penetrate the mind and body." Note: Research around the effects of EMFs is slim, according to the World Health Organization, but positioning your wifi router away from wherever you spend the most time and even turning it off at night is still a good idea.
Ancient feng shui masters knew what quantum physics is telling us today — that everything around us is composed of endless energy fields connecting everything you see, feel and touch (as well as millions of things we do not see with our physical eyes). There is really no separation between you and everything that surrounds you, and this, of course, includes your home.
The Five Elements or Forces (wu xing) – which, according to the Chinese, are metal, earth, fire, water, and wood – are first mentioned in Chinese literature in a chapter of the classic Book of History. They play a very important part in Chinese thought: ‘elements’ meaning generally not so much the actual substances as the forces essential to human life.[32] Earth is a buffer, or an equilibrium achieved when the polarities cancel each other.[citation needed] While the goal of Chinese medicine is to balance yin and yang in the body, the goal of feng shui has been described as aligning a city, site, building, or object with yin-yang force fields.[33]
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