Natural light is obviously very important for a genuinely good feng shui energy, too. In case of a space that gets little or no natural light, a very smart and intelligent lighting system (ideally several layers of lighting with at least some full-spectrum lights) will make all the difference.In order to attract (and keep, as well as multiply!) the energy of abundance, you have to create an honestly good quality of energy in your space, there is no way around it.
Not all bedrooms are ideal candidates for feng shui layouts. Most American homes weren't built with any feng shui considerations, so the challenges are always present when trying to create an auspicious feng shui bedroom layout and design. This is especially true of small bedrooms. Space is a premium in small bedrooms. This includes wall space that's often broken up by doors and windows.
Think back to your twin bed or futon in college. Would you still want to be sleeping in it? We didn’t think so. Cho says getting a full or queen size bed is ideal for feng shui because it fosters a restful night of sleep and lets chi circulate properly beneath it. It also creates a sense of togetherness between you and your partner (or future partner!). By comparison, twin beds can feel constricted and impermanent, whereas king size beds can be too spacious to promote intimacy. Plus, going oversized often means split box springs under the mattress, which can create disharmony, not to mention cause issues with your back, Cho says.
Citrine crystal is long known for attracting wealth, so it's often used in feng shui wealth applications. Citrine is also known to strengthen one's self-esteem, so it can be a good choice for your personal jewelry. You can also use a popular wealth stone, like pyrite. One creative way to display crystals is to place them on a feng shui gem tree in your home office for a beautiful look full of meaning and clarity.
According to feng shui expert, Rodika Tchi, Chi is manifested in yin yang characteristics, or the idea that our universe is made up of two opposing yet deeply interconnected forces of Yin and Yang. It is important to identify sources of imbalance and create once again the right amount for those that occupy a particular space and also for the space's original purpose. For example, a bedroom should be a place of rest and not of entertainment - at least not of electronic entertainment anyway - and there are specific feng shui guidelines you can follow to ensure this.
Make sure you have something representing the five elements — wood, earth, metal, fire, and water — in every room. The goal is to stay grounded, centered, and balanced in your life and your environment. For example, place a wooden bowl filled with stone pebbles alongside a candle and a vase of flowers. Or try to incorporate colors that symbolize the five elements:
Today, we are exposed to various feng shui systems and school of thoughts but classical feng shui, the one documented in classical Chinese texts, is divided into just two major systems: the oldest one which focuses on the observation of landforms and environmental features and the youngest one which is primarily based on formulas and takes in consideration that Qi changes over time but it is cyclical so it can be tracked and anticipated.
Similar to meditation, the practice of feng shui is deeply steeped in mindfulness, in slowing down and noticing the details in your life so that you can truly experience the present moment. The words "feng shui" are Chinese and translate to "wind" and "water." Wind is our breath, and humans are almost 60 percent water. Wind and water are vital elements for life, as is feng shui! Historically, feng shui has roots in Taoism and Buddhism. However, elements of feng shui are palpable in every culture across time. For instance, these days we can all feel the difference between a New York City apartment and a quiet hidden cabin in the forest, and we understand that our surroundings greatly affect our energy.
Feng shui is sometimes thought to be the art of placement—understanding how the placement of yourself and objects within a space affects your life in various areas of experience. It is a complex body of knowledge that teaches you how to balance and harmonize with the energies in any given space—be it a home, office, or garden. Its aim is to assure good fortune for the people inhabiting a space. Although regarded by some in the scientific community as a pseudo-science, feng shui has had an impact on the aesthetics of interior design and the architectural layout of living and working spaces both in its native eastern and, more recently, western cultures.  

Hello, I have a question about your article: “Feng Shui Tips for Money”. Your article says to replace any broken items in your home. We live in a rented apartment and the landlord did not do the usual fix-ups when the former tenants moved out. We moved in with the blinds broken in all four window, cracked closet doors, the door frame to the master bedroom is broken and won’t stay shut when closed (you can simply push the door open when “closed”, you don’t need to use the door knob to open/close the door), bathroom tiles messed up such that you have a hard time opening/closing the door and the closet inside the bathroom, problems with plumbing and the stove and refrigerator…crayola marks everywhere, cigarette burns in the carpets and you get the idea here. The apartment was in such a poor state, we refused to give the landlord a deposit unless we could do a walk-through with him and get it in writing about all the broken and poor conditions of everything. He had a fit and would not do it. We’ve been living here since late August, 2015. He finally fixed the plumbing issues and our heater. But that’s all he fixed. We are not responsible for any of the other things, so how would your Feng Shui tips to repair broken things in the home really apply in our situation? What would be a “work around” for NOT doing repairs to a rented apartment, when they were already there when we moved into the unit? Also, about the citrine in the windowsill.. we have four large windows, each with a windowsill. Do I put a piece of citrine in just one of them or in all four? If in only one windowsill, which one? Kitchen, living room, master bedroom (this is being used as our temple/cat room) – or in our bedroom?
Getting started with feng shui for your home is easy when you begin with the house basics and gradually move on to the more complex feng shui levels. After you have mastered these seven home feng shui steps, you can explore the deeper levels of feng shui, such as the annual movement of feng shui stars, or energies. The important things to remember are to start simply, have fun, and thoroughly enjoy the process—this is good feng shui.
Have a solid headboard. The best Feng Shui headboards are the ones that are solid and made from wood, or the upholstered ones, as they have a very good combination of solid, but also gentle and supporting Feng Shui energy for you and your bedroom. While you are drifting off to sleep, your body is going into an extra busy energy repair work on many levels. Subconsciously, your head needs good backing, protection and support, just like your back needs it when you are sitting in a chair for extended periods of time.
As you'd probably expect, your headboard and bed frame play a significant role in optimizing the feng shui of your bedroom, according to Cerrano. Choose "a solid wooden headboard and frame," she suggests. This "is a common suggestion in Western feng shui because the element of wood relates to the symbolic nature of supporting your body and energy when sleeping," she explains.
In Feng Shui art, it is recommended to place green plants in the office. They are valuable for health and work conditions because they bring positive energies and they increase the creative work and the productivity. The best plant for office is bamboo because it brings luck. Place the plants from east to south-east. Avoid cactuses, bonsai and sharp edged leaves plants.
A grave at Puyang (around 4000 BC) that contains mosaics— actually a Chinese star map of the Dragon and Tiger asterisms and Beidou (the Big Dipper, Ladle or Bushel)— is oriented along a north–south axis.[6] The presence of both round and square shapes in the Puyang tomb, at Hongshan ceremonial centers and at the late Longshan settlement at Lutaigang,[7] suggests that gaitian cosmography (heaven-round, earth-square) existed in Chinese society long before it appeared in the Zhoubi Suanjing.[8]
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