"Family pictures don't belong in the bedroom," says Whitehurst. "It's the most intimate room in the house and should be reserved for you and your partner." Pictures of children, relatives, and friends may cause you to think about your obligations — and that doesn't allow the mind (or body) to rest. So keep only pictures of you and your spouse or partner in the bedroom, and put other pictures in the dining or family rooms.
Charvatova, I., Klokocnik, J., Kolmas, J., & Kostelecky, J. (2011). Chinese tombs oriented by a compass: Evidence from paleomagnetic changes versus the age of tombs. Studia Geophysica Et Geodaetica, 55(1), 159–74. doi:10.1007/s11200-011-0009-2. Abstract: "Extant written records indicate that knowledge of an ancient type of compass in China is very old – dating back to before the Han dynasty (206 BC – 220 AD) to at least the 4th century BC. Geomancy (feng shui) was practised for a long time (for millennia) and had a profound influence on the face of China's landscape and city plans. The tombs (pyramids) near the former Chinese capital cities of Xi'an and Luoyang (together with their suburban fields and roads) show strong spatial orientations, sometimes along a basic south–north axis (relative to the geographic pole), but usually with deviations of several degrees to the East or West. The use of the compass means that the needle was directed towards the actual magnetic pole at the time of construction, or last reconstruction, of the respective tomb. However the magnetic pole, relative to the nearly 'fixed' geographic pole, shifts significantly over time. By matching paleomagnetic observations with modeled paleomagnetic history we have identified the date of pyramid construction in central China with the orientation relative to the magnetic pole positions at the respective time of construction. As in Mesoamerica, where according to the Fuson hypothesis the Olmecs and Maya oriented their ceremonial buildings and pyramids using a compass even before the Chinese, here in central China the same technique may have been used. We found a good agreement of trends between the paleodeclinations observed from tomb alignments and the available global geomagnetic field model CALS7K.2."
Hi Victor! The beam in our room is placed in the middle, so there’s no way you can avoid it even if you move the bed, so i made a diy canopy to cover the beam. We’re living in an apartment so we cannot put a false ceiling. Is canopy fine? Also there is a pillar at the back of our headboard, and again, we cant move the bed in any other place coz we only have limited space. What is the best cure for the pillar? Thanks!
Traditional, or classical feng shui schools, have many symbols used for various purposes. Some feng shui symbols are well known, such as the Mandarin Ducks for love and marriage, the Tortoise for protection and stability, or the Koi Fish for abundance. Some feng shui symbols, such as Bats or Chi Lins, are less known. This list of feng shui symbols should help you. There is a subtle line between the use of the words "feng shui symbols" and "feng shui cures", as symbols are used as feng shui cures. Be sure to read all about feng shui cures in order to understand more about shifting the energy with feng shui.
You guessed it. Electronics, like a TV, laptop and smartphone, are a bedroom no-no because they can delay — or disrupt — sleep. If you use your phone as your alarm clock, keep it five to 10 feet away from your bed so you have to get up to shut it off. This way, you’re also not tempted for a late-night scroll on Instagram or Facebook. Guilty? “Before you consider buying a white noise maker, I would try to remove as many electronics from your bedroom,” Cho says. According Cho and other feng shui experts, electronics release electromagnetic energy, even if they’re not being used, so it’s best to keep them out of the bedroom. You might also want to try flowing to these yoga poses to help prepare your body for bed.
And when you wake up in the morning, seeing a vibrant plant can help energize you, she adds. You can also try playing up your sense of smell. Sometimes, scent is all you need to shift energy in a room from stressed and anxiety-ridden to calm and collected. A 2012 poll conducted by the National Sleep Foundation found that people are more excited to go to bed on sheets with a fresh scent. That’s why Cho and many other feng shui experts also recommend getting a diffuser with essential oils. “Orange and lavender oils are great for de-stressing and relaxing,” Cho says.

In feng shui, a cluttered house equals a cluttered mind. Even worse, clutter literally sucks up the energy in a space. "You may think you're hiding your clutter, but the closet has as much of an effect on energy flow as anything else," says Whitehurst. If there's clutter somewhere in your home — even tucked away in an attic — then it's also cluttering your head, as well as the rest of your body.
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Polarity is expressed in feng shui as yin and yang theory. Polarity expressed through yin and yang is similar to a magnetic dipole. That is, it is of two parts: one creating an exertion and one receiving the exertion. Yang acting and yin receiving could be considered an early understanding of chirality.[clarification needed] The development of this theory and its corollary, five phase theory (five element theory), have also been linked with astronomical observations of sunspots.[31]
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