Yin and yang represent feminine and masculine energies. Nourishing energy strikes a balance between the two extreme forces of yin and yang. Let’s say for example you worked in an overly yang environment with high ceilings, light colors, angular furniture and lots of natural light. You would need to balance this overly yang environment with some yin energy. You might add curved or flowing shapes, darker colors, soft furniture and some window coverings. Read more about yin and yang energy here.
We already know that some plants have the ability to clean the air (literally). Self-purifying plants can filter the air of harmful chemicals, resulting in cleaner breathing air—but what if they could do more than that? We chatted with expert Marianne Gordon of Feng Shui With Me—who helps clients find true love, enhance fertility, and acquire wealth through feng shui courses and consultations—to find out what other hidden benefits plants might have in the feng shui of our homes and, most importantly, where to place them to maximize their positive effects.

To ensure harmony and calm your nerves/soothes your temper, play some music around you. Aim for calming melodies or songs without any lyrics. Try to avoid anything too upbeat or energetic as it may distract you if you’re meant to be concentrating on your work. However, different people respond to different music. If you find rock ballads to be soothing, go ahead and play them. If you are running your own business, having soothing music place in the office is good for business and your employees. Alternatively, getting your clients to meet somewhere with pleasant music can ensure higher chances of discussion or deals.

It is necessary to keep the soil of the pot in  a moist condition even if it is a small pot. Many people consider that the jade plants are the symbol of good luck as it resembles the artificial decorative plant. The reason behind keeping the plant in the office is,it can strengthen the energy of the workers. At the same time, it symbolizes to increase the profit of the office.     


Take a look at a list of 10 plants that were defined by NASA research in the early 1980s as species with good air-purifying qualities. These plants continue to do a fine job of air purification. Common airborne toxins and pollutants in the home that plants can scrub from the air include benzene, formaldehyde, and trichloroethylene, xylene, and ammonia.

Native to French Polynesia, golden pathos are categorized under the plants family Araceae with scientific name Epipremnum Aureum, it is commonly known as Money Plant and very popularly grown plant in India. It has several local names like golden pathos, ivy arum, taro vine, Solomon Island ivy and devil’s vine. The plant has shiny heart-shaped leaves in the different shades of green and has several beliefs associated with the plant, it is believed that the plant brings luck, happiness and prosperity. As per Feng Shui, it is considered to bring wealth.
"In a vase, place a few stalks of bamboos in fresh water," says Gordon. "Place five stalks in a vase for academic achievement and creativity (in your creativity area), place seven stalks in your health and family area, place eight stalks in your wealth area, and nine stalks for overall luck (you can place these anywhere, but it could also be in the center of your home). Don't forget to change the water frequently."
Irregular room shape: Use a faceted crystal sphere, mirror, or plant to correct the space. If your office is extremely irregular, you can have inexplicable setbacks and continuous frustrations at work. If you can’t switch offices, you can apply the special nine green plants cure: Add nine healthy new plants to your space all on the same day. The plants should be purchased new for the purpose of this cure. If convenient, you can place the plants near particular irregularities in the room, such as strange angles, posts, cramped areas, and so on. Otherwise, just stick them where they fit best. For full results from this cure, visualize that your job and career are going very well.
When you’re setting up your room (or cubicle), you'll want to first look at its layout. Is there an even distribution of furniture on both sides of the room? Is there art only on one wall, or is it sprinkled throughout the space? Is it too bright? Is it too minimalist? How balanced and even do you feel in your workspace? Where and how do things feel off?
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