Lucky bamboo plant is often associated with Feng Shui friendly plants. Lucky bamboo is easy to grow, doesn’t require a lot of sunlight, and because it can be grown in water it can be an excellent choice for bathrooms and kitchens. However, you don’t have to limit your choices to lucky bamboo when selecting a plant to use in your Feng Shui décor. Here are 9 additional Feng Shui friendly houseplants --
Of course, fire is the most powerful element and should be used with caution so that no one gets burned. This is true in both the literal and figurative sense with Feng Shui office designs since using actual fire elements can often be dangerous. Therefore, you can use red objects to represent the fire element and should be place in the south section of the room, office space, or building. Lamps and unique lighting can also be used to represent fire elements for the office.
Wooden desks are very creative but may be too unfocused. In feng shui, the wood element carries a more wild, chatty, creative energy, which can get a little frenetic for an office space. You can rein in your focus with a sparkly crystal on your desktop (spirit quartz and shimmering pyrite are my top picks) and/or some metallic desk accessories that have more organized, uniform energy.
However, using plants for feng shui can get tricky. You’ll need to factor in the five elements, the type of room, and the directions. It’s not easy, but that’s the only way you can apply feng shui in a holistic way to get the best results that you desired for. Of course, the alternative is to get help from a professional so you won’t overlook any important factors when you feng shui yourself.

Feng shui (pronounced "fung shway") is the ancient Chinese practice of arranging physical objects to attract positive energy. It’s based on the idea that everything in a person’s surrounding environment affects his or her inner life. Feng shui practitioners believe that the placement of objects in a room, building, or other space will affect the flow of chi (life force or essential energy) within the space. If there’s good chi flowing, whoever’s in the space will get a boost of positive energy. Pretty sweet, right?
Symbolic for good luck and success due to their innate resilience, strength, and ability to grow quickly, the lucky bamboo plants attempt to balance the five natural feng shui elements in the home or office: wood, metal, earth, water, and fire. These five elements are represented, respectively, by the plant, glass vase or coin, rocks, water, and red ribbon. Lucky bamboo plants can be planted as stalks or grown into beautiful shapes such as pyramids.
As a feng shui cure, it is usually placed in the entryway or the southwest corner of the room or establishment to strengthen the energy and flow of money. Jade plants can grow as an indoor or outdoor plant and ideally should be put in a location where they can get direct sunlight. Water them enough to keep their soil moist and regularly dust off their leaves. You can also add pebbles on top of their soil to facilitate the drainage of water.
Creating an environment where Chi prospers positions you for everlasting success! Feng Shui will help you facilitate an environment that keeps you energized, brimming with new ideas and creativity, invite raises, and cultivate your family life at home. The venerable Chinese art of arrangement focuses on the placement of objects in particular directions to align Chi (or energy) to manifest the desired outcome. 
When choosing the colors for your office, you can either go with the elemental guide above or choose a general, lighter color. Yellow, sandstone, pale gold, or green work well. If you want to ground or stabilize, you can choose browns or other earth tones. For large offices with open floor plans, it is important to have subtle colors. When you try to incorporate a bright color in a large active room, it can become too distracting and more stressful.

Feng shui philosophy tells us to position the desk so that you are in command of the room. Essentially, this means your back shouldn't be facing the door. Beyond the biological aspect of feeling less innately safe with our back to the door, there’s a lot of feng shui lore about this position allowing for things to happen at work "behind your back."
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