Feng shui isn’t a magic formula; rather, it provides a visual reminder of the areas of life that you value or are working to improve. Chin notes that feng shui is a “matter of perspective, a way of thinking or creating balance in our lives.” Start by following the guidelines above as a way to add positivity and balance to your desk—and to your life!
"Once you have a clearer vision for the function of your office and understand what pieces of furniture you need, you can establish the arrangement of furniture," says Cerrano. She recommends starting with the desk position and building outward from there. "Essentially, you are looking for the best commanding position, which allows the occupant to literally, energetically, and metaphorically see and feel who and what opportunities are approaching their life. Positioning your desk inside any office could symbolize avoiding collaborations with unbeneficial business partners and signing contracts or agreements that are one-sided."
Make sure that your desk or work space isn’t facing any sharp corners or edges. Such as pillars, other buildings or walls and so on. These sharp edges can invite in negative energy. They will cause migraines, headaches, pressure and unhappiness for yourself and others. Keep your desk facing a different way or try to put up a blockade or something between your desk and the sharp edge or corner if you can’t move it.  If it is truly unavoidable and you feel uncomfortable, place a bowl of salt or a salt lamp between you and the sharp corners to minimize pressure and “Sha Qi”.

Cerrano also reminds us to think of function above all when planning your home office space. "Remember to take into consideration the function of the office, and become decisive with the type and amount of furniture that is needed. This will save you time, money, and reduce stress," she says. "Invest in a supportive office chair, especially if you plan on sitting for several hours in a day. Experts say moving more during the workday and stretching is the best solution."
However, using plants for feng shui can get tricky. You’ll need to factor in the five elements, the type of room, and the directions. It’s not easy, but that’s the only way you can apply feng shui in a holistic way to get the best results that you desired for. Of course, the alternative is to get help from a professional so you won’t overlook any important factors when you feng shui yourself.

Benko recalls a client whose family photo was hindering rather than inspiring her. Even though the photo was taken during a vacation, the client revealed it was a very stressful time. "The kids were hungry and they felt forced to pose for the picture, so every time she looked at that picture, subconsciously she was feeling the stress and anxiety of that moment," says Benko.
If you definitely can’t move your sitting position, you can place an 8-x-10-inch mirror in a picture frame or on a small stand to reflect the entrance of the cube to allow you to see if anyone is approaching. Many people subconsciously use the reflections in their computer monitor to see who’s approaching them, because seeing the entrance is a basic human need. The problem is that the reflection in a monitor’s screen is distorted, unclear, and unreliable.
Feng shui (pronounced "fung shway") is the ancient Chinese practice of arranging physical objects to attract positive energy. It’s based on the idea that everything in a person’s surrounding environment affects his or her inner life. Feng shui practitioners believe that the placement of objects in a room, building, or other space will affect the flow of chi (life force or essential energy) within the space. If there’s good chi flowing, whoever’s in the space will get a boost of positive energy. Pretty sweet, right?
When you’re setting up your room (or cubicle), you'll want to first look at its layout. Is there an even distribution of furniture on both sides of the room? Is there art only on one wall, or is it sprinkled throughout the space? Is it too bright? Is it too minimalist? How balanced and even do you feel in your workspace? Where and how do things feel off?
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