According to feng shui expert RD Chin, people often turn to the practice if “they don’t feel right or comfortable in their space.” Perhaps nowhere is this more relevant than in the workspace—painful chairs, bad lighting, and a boss breathing down our necks hardly promote feelings of comfort. That’s where feng shui comes in. If you’re looking to feel a little more “at home” even while at work, or just want to send some good vibes your way on the job (promotion, anyone?), read on to find out how to use feng shui on your desk!
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Outer offices: Large offices, especially high-rise offices often have a bank of windows along the outside wall. While it may be tempting to sit with your back to the windows, you will lack the support you need in your work. Place your desk so you have a solid wall behind you. Use a feng shui office layout for auspicious chi energy and success in your career.
Beyond the layout, Cerrano also recommends paying attention to colors and materials in your space. "Be mindful with the style of desk and material you choose," she says. "A rectangular wooden desk is commonly the best recommendation in feng shui. The material brings natural energy into your space, while also cultivating a nourishing and vibrant quality of energy. If you prefer a standing desk, consider researching a wooden design. In general, the size, style, and color depends on the overall room structure and intended office environment. As a side note, you may also want to consider purchasing a desk that has soft or rounded edges—even if in a rectangular or L-shape design."
One of the key principles of feng shui is achieving happiness. One of the the easiest steps towards achieving this is through organizing and removing clutter around the office. The idea is that clearing away clutter helps bring in vital energy which promotes clarity and focus. Overall, 50% of your desk should be cleared. You want to be able to arrive at a clean desk when you get to work and leave with a clean desk at the end of the day. Taking the extra time to organize things correctly and efficiently will help you from having to do it again in a few months.

The image to the left is a good example of a balanced environment. It has characteristics of all five feng shui elements. The wood element can be seen in the soaring vertical window treatments. The earth element is represented by the horizontal, rectangular furniture as well as the earthy colors and pottery. The fire element is brought in through the natural and artificial lighting and the antler base of the lamp. Finally, the water element can be seen in the mirror and asymmetrical shapes.
The Goldon Pothos is said to be particularly good for removing formaldehyde and carbon monoxide. I like to recommend this to plant to the houseplant novice. It’s great for dead corners and areas above cabinets or shelves. In feng shui, these types of locations in your home attract and easily collect stagnant and dead energy. Because the Golden Pothos is easy to care for and low light, it’s perfect in these places. The plant will stay green, can be slightly neglected but still bring life energy to that area.
Tending to the abundance sector of your space will help ring in that raise you’ve been pining for! Promote the growth of your wealth (and internal happiness) by introducing a plant. Philodendrons bloom wonderfully in office spaces, as do succulents which are drought resistant and don’t take up too much space, when potted appropriately (in a small planter, that is.)
If you have been neglecting your work environment, take some time now to pay attention to the feng shui of your office, and we mean really pay attention to what is going on in your workspace. Answer some basic feng shui questions, such as, for example: What is happening behind your back? What do you first see as you come in? What is the quality of the air you breathe in? The quality of light? 
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