Alison, thanks for writing. My desk in my home office also faces a wall so I know whereof you speak. If you can’t turn things around by separating the arms of the “L” and using one arm in the Command Position, place a mirror on or near the desk to reflect activity behind you. Here’s a link to a previous post about this: http://openspacesfengshui.com/feng-shui-tips/2010/02/feng-shui-office-command-position/ Good luck!

Color is big in feng shui as it is the easiest, almost instant way to create a specific quality of energy. Here are the best colors for a good feng shui desk, but you should take care to choose what works for your energy and your line of work. (If you want to understand more about the color of power, dive into the world of the five feng shui elements as each color represents a specific feng shui element)


Once you have a full view of any incoming opportunities, it’s time to tackle the desk's surface. Chances are there’s a bit of clutter, which Cerrano defines as “anything unfinished, unresolved, tolerated, or disorganized.” Clear the clutter and organize things in a way that suits your work style and personal preferences. Cerrano suggests organizing by date or category, using colored binders if that appeals to you. Getting organized can boost productivity, while clearing clutter can provide a space that allows creativity to flow Time management for today’s workplace demands. Thomack, B. Matrix Absence Management, Phoenix, AZ. Workplace Health and Safety, 2012 May;60(5):201-3.
Yin and yang represent feminine and masculine energies. Nourishing energy strikes a balance between the two extreme forces of yin and yang. Let’s say for example you worked in an overly yang environment with high ceilings, light colors, angular furniture and lots of natural light. You would need to balance this overly yang environment with some yin energy. You might add curved or flowing shapes, darker colors, soft furniture and some window coverings. Read more about yin and yang energy here.
When it comes to the link between colors and performance, Feng
 Shui distinguishes between tones which stimulate the mind (gray, white, and muted shades) and those that invigorate the body (brown and bright hues). For
 this reason, medium-toned wooden desks are considered the best office option as they provide optimal contrast and minimal distraction.
Projecting corner, post, pillar, column, soffit, or duct work: Many offices contain features that break up the energy flow of the room or, worse, shoot “poison arrows” at your sitting position at the desk. Place a sizeable plant in front of the troublesome feature, or hang a faceted crystal sphere between the feature and your sitting position at the desk.
Blue is the prime color of the water element, and its low, smooth vibrations always provide feelings of comfort and safety. Lighter blues encourage healing, growth and harmony while darker richer blues promote the deepest levels of solace, calm and serenity. To invoke all of these benefits, paint one wall dark blue and the rest light blue. Because of its calming nature, blue is an ideal color for deadline-oriented office spaces such as press rooms or payroll companies.
"In the bedroom, make it work by adding patterns into the mix, or painting only one wall black — the one behind the bed, as a grounding element," Frampton explains. Or add some luminosity, as seen here in a New York City kitchen Frampton designed: "This backsplash has an iridescent quality — as you move, the light catches it. That counteracts that black and softens the whole look."
If you are not feeling quite right in your office, it could be time for a feng shui overhaul. Feng shui is an ancient Chinese system to help organize your life to promote the flow of energy. Applying these principles to your office will help increase productivity lower stress. Simple things such as removing clutter from your desktop, choosing the right paint colors or artwork, and keeping the right elemental balance of objects in your office all make a surprisingly large impact on your work day.
The expert also warns against a workspace that serves multiple functions: "Another hiccup to the feng shui-ing process is sharing your home office with too many people. Learn to set healthy boundaries. I've had clients who shared their office file cabinet, desk, and other means of storage with their children. The result? Toys, drawings, and homework took over their office, creating a clutter of distraction with limited storage space."

If you have to share your office space with another, you should try to avoid sitting back to back. It is also best to avoid sitting face to face. Both positions tend to create conflict. If you can’t avoid sitting face to face, either stagger the desks or create a small barrier with a plant, photo or other object. Concentrate on acoustical privacy—use headphones and muffle phone conversations.

Feng shui philosophy tells us to position the desk so that you are in command of the room. Essentially, this means your back shouldn't be facing the door. Beyond the biological aspect of feeling less innately safe with our back to the door, there’s a lot of feng shui lore about this position allowing for things to happen at work "behind your back."
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