It is commonly called as crassula ovate and are creatures that gives small flowers. In Asian countries, people grow this plant, to improve their prosperity.  The plant has coin shaped succulent leaves and it doesn’t require more water. Also, it has shiny leaves. The shedding of the leaves indicates that the plant require more water than you give it daily. It starts to bloom at the time of winter.


The jade plant is another plant commonly known as a money tree in feng shui because the round leaves symbolize good fortune. These plants are relatively hardy succulents, so they may be a better money tree choice for those challenged at keeping plants alive. Like the traditional money tree, jade plants are best placed in money, health, or fame areas of the home. You can also place them in an office space to invite success and fortune.

So how is feng shui different from just getting organized or decorating better? “It goes beyond just decorating because feng shui has a psychological component to the principles, says Laura Cerrano of Feng Shui Manhattan. "Your surroundings have a deep and profound impact on your emotional, mental, physical, and spiritual well-being.” Since the daily nine-to-five makes up a big part of the day, improving the chi in the workspace will help you out at work and in the rest of your life.


For many years, Feng Shui colors have been considered to be powerful tools when it comes to creating the best environments. Whether you are an executive with a busy and demanding job, or if you are new to working in an office, there are many ways in which Feng Shui elements can help you to create a good office environment. Offices don’t often give many opportunities to use color, but using the elements, it is possible to create a more positive working environment.
When it comes to the colors on your walls, use white if you tend to find it very difficult to concentrate because you are in your comfortable home environment. And when it comes to elements, use water to inspire communication, metal to encourage prosperity, earth to promote long-standing relationships and balance in the workplace, fire to boost productivity, and wood to allow your creativity to flow.
Once you have a full view of any incoming opportunities, it’s time to tackle the desk's surface. Chances are there’s a bit of clutter, which Cerrano defines as “anything unfinished, unresolved, tolerated, or disorganized.” Clear the clutter and organize things in a way that suits your work style and personal preferences. Cerrano suggests organizing by date or category, using colored binders if that appeals to you. Getting organized can boost productivity, while clearing clutter can provide a space that allows creativity to flow Time management for today’s workplace demands. Thomack, B. Matrix Absence Management, Phoenix, AZ. Workplace Health and Safety, 2012 May;60(5):201-3.
Anjie Cho is the founder of Holistic Spaces and Anjie Cho Architect, integrating beauty, spirituality and green design. She creates and enhances balance and harmony by designing spaces with an understanding of sustainability and informed by the ancient practice of feng shui. Her focus is to create a nurturing and supportive environment for each of her clients. Anjie is a registered New York State Architect, Interior Designer, LEED Accredited Professional, and certified Feng Shui consultant. For over 14 years, she has been creating beautiful and nourishing environments. A graduate in Architecture from the University of California at Berkeley, Anjie is a sought-after expert in the fields of feng shui and green design.

"Feng shui emphasizes the harmony with one's internal and external environment and the world at large," he explains. "Creating this harmony is particularly important when assessing the color of one’s home office, the place in the home where wealth and abundance are of paramount importance." So how exactly should you choose the ideal feng shui office colors? Brown recommends answering one simple question: Which cardinal direction does your home office face? 
I have a full length double mirror in my home office. I cannot cover it. It reflects my desk but i have nowhere else to place my desk where it does not reflect it, however i am not facing the mirror it is to the left of my desk and chair. Is there something i can do to improve the problem. I also have a window behind me at the desk and no room to place a plant or artwork as it is a full wall window and small room, i have thick red draps as it is also my fame bagua, is there anything else i can do to improve this problem? Also, moving my desk means my back is facing the door. Thanking you.
The Chinese practice of feng shui dates back several millennia and basically involves arranging your environment in such a way that everything harmonizes and stimulates positive energy. According to these principles, using feng shui in your home office can help enhance productivity, creativity and even your earnings. We have some tips from Feng Shui & Beyond, an online guide to the practice, on how to feng shui your home office.
"In a vase, place a few stalks of bamboos in fresh water," says Gordon. "Place five stalks in a vase for academic achievement and creativity (in your creativity area), place seven stalks in your health and family area, place eight stalks in your wealth area, and nine stalks for overall luck (you can place these anywhere, but it could also be in the center of your home). Don't forget to change the water frequently."
When choosing the colors for your office, you can either go with the elemental guide above or choose a general, lighter color. Yellow, sandstone, pale gold, or green work well. If you want to ground or stabilize, you can choose browns or other earth tones. For large offices with open floor plans, it is important to have subtle colors. When you try to incorporate a bright color in a large active room, it can become too distracting and more stressful.
Anjie Cho is the founder of Holistic Spaces and Anjie Cho Architect, integrating beauty, spirituality and green design. She creates and enhances balance and harmony by designing spaces with an understanding of sustainability and informed by the ancient practice of feng shui. Her focus is to create a nurturing and supportive environment for each of her clients. Anjie is a registered New York State Architect, Interior Designer, LEED Accredited Professional, and certified Feng Shui consultant. For over 14 years, she has been creating beautiful and nourishing environments. A graduate in Architecture from the University of California at Berkeley, Anjie is a sought-after expert in the fields of feng shui and green design.
According to feng shui expert RD Chin, people often turn to the practice if “they don’t feel right or comfortable in their space.” Perhaps nowhere is this more relevant than in the workspace—painful chairs, bad lighting, and a boss breathing down our necks hardly promote feelings of comfort. That’s where feng shui comes in. If you’re looking to feel a little more “at home” even while at work, or just want to send some good vibes your way on the job (promotion, anyone?), read on to find out how to use feng shui on your desk!
Feng shui philosophy tells us to position the desk so that you are in command of the room. Essentially, this means your back shouldn't be facing the door. Beyond the biological aspect of feeling less innately safe with our back to the door, there’s a lot of feng shui lore about this position allowing for things to happen at work "behind your back."
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