I suggest sitting in a chair, in each of the positions you mention, and seeing where you feel most “in charge” of your space. Without seeing the situation, I am imagining that the Command Position/window setup might be best, as you should be able to block the bottom half of the window so that your Chi energy doesn’t flow out the window. But your own sense of safety and power are what count the most.
If you definitely can’t move your sitting position, you can place an 8-x-10-inch mirror in a picture frame or on a small stand to reflect the entrance of the cube to allow you to see if anyone is approaching. Many people subconsciously use the reflections in their computer monitor to see who’s approaching them, because seeing the entrance is a basic human need. The problem is that the reflection in a monitor’s screen is distorted, unclear, and unreliable.
Imagine the desktop divided into a nine-part grid, as in the bagua map shown above. Choose several areas of your life that could use a little boost, and use the following tips to attract good energy to those areas. Each section is associated with a color, and you can use objects of that color if you have them. Just don’t go overboard—remember, clutter blocks creativity, so at least 50 percent of the desktop should be clear at all times. Don’t focus on all nine sections; instead, select two to three priorities.
Plants may be just one element of Feng Shui; however, they can play a major role in office environments. Plants can buffer noise in an office increasing the amount of privacy felt in open floor plans. Plants, in general are known to make people happy and more creative, although this might be intangible, the extra added health benefits of having plants in an office are not. Plants increase oxygenation and filter out impurities in the air reducing the amount of bacteria and germs that are usually present in any shared environment. Therefore, office spaces with plants statistically have fewer employees that need to take sick leave. See here for 10 peaceful plants for Feng Shui.
Imagine the desktop divided into a nine-part grid, as in the bagua map shown above. Choose several areas of your life that could use a little boost, and use the following tips to attract good energy to those areas. Each section is associated with a color, and you can use objects of that color if you have them. Just don’t go overboard—remember, clutter blocks creativity, so at least 50 percent of the desktop should be clear at all times. Don’t focus on all nine sections; instead, select two to three priorities.
Get rid of the nonessentials in every cranny—this includes those drawers you rarely open. Clutter (even the clutter that's hidden away) keeps your work feeling stuck. This includes digital clutter and scheduling clutter, too! You may want to try to spend time every day looking over your schedule and visualizing what’s to come, clearing away or canceling anything that’s unnecessary, and preparing for the day to flow more smoothly.
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