When it comes to the colors on your walls, use white if you tend to find it very difficult to concentrate because you are in your comfortable home environment. And when it comes to elements, use water to inspire communication, metal to encourage prosperity, earth to promote long-standing relationships and balance in the workplace, fire to boost productivity, and wood to allow your creativity to flow.

It gives best results in the loose soil with a lot of drainage holes and hence, while planting, ensure that the pot has enough drainage facilities. Keep watering the plants regularly without fail. In between the watering, look after the fact that avoids drying of the top soil.  As it prefers indirect sunlight, people should keep the plant away from the direct sunlight. It requires the temperature between 65 to 70 degrees to grow well.
When choosing the colors for your office, you can either go with the elemental guide above or choose a general, lighter color. Yellow, sandstone, pale gold, or green work well. If you want to ground or stabilize, you can choose browns or other earth tones. For large offices with open floor plans, it is important to have subtle colors. When you try to incorporate a bright color in a large active room, it can become too distracting and more stressful.
A cubicle is a much trickier Feng Shui situation than an office room. Cubicles are unfortunate paradigms of vulnerability for the individual worker. One of the chief problems is that you don’t use a real desk but work from a countertop, unless you work in one of the large manager type cubicles. However, you can do plenty to improve your situation. By judiciously applying Feng Shui cures, you may find yourself in your own office sooner than you imagined. (See Figure 1 for cure placements.)
Once you know your personal kua number, take advantage of your best working direction. Without knowing this, you can still take control of your office by placing your desk diagonally across from the door. Further enhance your position by anchoring one end of the desk to a wall (meaning that end of your desk touches the wall). Don't sit with the door opening to your side since this creates poison arrows.
Feng shui philosophy tells us to position the desk so that you are in command of the room. Essentially, this means your back shouldn't be facing the door. Beyond the biological aspect of feeling less innately safe with our back to the door, there’s a lot of feng shui lore about this position allowing for things to happen at work "behind your back."
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