If your table is facing a doorway, walk path or corridor, make sure you have a mini partition to block the direct energies that may affect you. Corridors and doorway openings have a form of fast moving energy. There energies may distract you so that you can’t fully concentrate on your work. Make sure to have a small blockade or wall that ensures you can’t easily see the doorway or corridor infront of you.  If it is your own business or office premise, you can put up curtains as well (simple and effective).
The color white is considered to be among the list of supreme colors from the ancient yogi tradition and is of the metal element. White vibrates with high intensity and represents purity, new possibilities, focus and cleanliness. Making an office entirely white is often too intense, causing occupants to become unsettled, hyper-focused and stressed. This is why it is best to use it as an accent color. For example, if you were to paint your walls terra cotta or light blue you could paint the doors and trim white to add just enough purity and crispness to the existing color scheme to simply enhance the other attributes of the primary color scheme. This makes white an ideal accent color for any type of office environment.
Kitchens hold special importance in the practice of Feng Shui, alongside bedrooms and entrances. Traditionally, they represent a place of nourishment and family. In an office setting, they are important because they offer employees a space to relax, regenerate and feed their mind. In Feng Shui, kitchens are ideally placed away from main entrances and bathrooms to promote good "chi". Changing the positioning of the kitchen in your office space may not be possible—but managers can use strategically placed furniture, greenery or art to liven up break areas.
The second priority is bringing living and flowing energy into your workspace. These features are important ways of compensating for the small size of your space and the constant traffic flows that pass by your cube. If you can bring an odd number of healthy plants into your space, you can stimulate more-active, vibrant energy. Also, a nice fountain near the entrance of your cube can work wonders. Not only can it stimulate more salary coming your way, but also it can help uplift your mood and diffuse any negative flows of chi (human or environmental) in the vicinity of your work space. If space or social realities preclude a fountain, you can get some of the same benefits from a photo (the larger, the better) of flowing water, such as of a waterfall or river.

A cubicle is a much trickier Feng Shui situation than an office room. Cubicles are unfortunate paradigms of vulnerability for the individual worker. One of the chief problems is that you don’t use a real desk but work from a countertop, unless you work in one of the large manager type cubicles. However, you can do plenty to improve your situation. By judiciously applying Feng Shui cures, you may find yourself in your own office sooner than you imagined. (See Figure 1 for cure placements.)


Get rid of the nonessentials in every cranny—this includes those drawers you rarely open. Clutter (even the clutter that's hidden away) keeps your work feeling stuck. This includes digital clutter and scheduling clutter, too! You may want to try to spend time every day looking over your schedule and visualizing what’s to come, clearing away or canceling anything that’s unnecessary, and preparing for the day to flow more smoothly.
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