The entrance to your office is a key component of feng shui because it is what allows energy to flow freely into and out of your space. Therefore, making sure it is free of clutter is imperative. Also, the door to your office should open completely without anything getting in the way. These are the first steps you can take when applying the principles of feng shui to your workspace. The idea is that you will have your physical door wide open to welcome new clients, new work, and more money.
As the end of year approaches, it's often easy to feel overworked, sluggish, and a little deflated. You might secretly hope that the holiday break was already here, but despite your wishful thinking, the last quarter of the year is also often the busiest. Between holiday parties and social gatherings, you're also expected to tie all your loose ends before the year's end. Cue late nights at the office or working from your sofa or bed after dinner as you try to make it to the finish line.
Hurrah! Spring is here! In feng shui philosophy, the spring season symbolizes new beginnings, growth, and expansion—like when the trees start to grow back their leaves. We use plants, the colors green and blue, as well as columnar and expansive shapes in feng shui to symbolize this type of energy. But in addition to making indoor spaces more attractive, did you know that houseplants also improve indoor air quality? Many houseplants remove harmful pollutants from the air that off gas from synthetic materials found in our buildings, furniture, and even clothing. These toxins can lead to poor health and low productivity. Adding plants to a space can also help create a softer and more vibrant energy, and they can heal us visually and physically—their natural green tones are relaxing and therapeutic. Now that the new season has sprung, infuse some positive energy into your home and adopt a houseplant this spring. Below are the three houseplants commonly used in feng shui adjustments.
Did you know that, according to feng shui, choosing the best paint color for a room all depends on where it's located in your home? We didn't either, that is until we spoke with feng shui expert Robert Brown, MD, author of Toxic Home/Conscious Home. Having studied mindfulness at home at length and in a holistic way, Brown knows exactly how to apply feng shui principles to achieve a healthy and happy home.
clear the desk every day. if i stopped by right now and calculated how much free space is on your desk, what would my sum be? when a workspace is bogged down by paperwork, guess how we feel? always leave your desk clean + clear when you’re finished. this increases productivity and job satisfaction. if that’s not motivation enough, take one guess what ritual top entrepreneurs around the world have in common? a clean desk. yes, even necessity likes to feel beautiful.
If you are not feeling quite right in your office, it could be time for a feng shui overhaul. Feng shui is an ancient Chinese system to help organize your life to promote the flow of energy. Applying these principles to your office will help increase productivity lower stress. Simple things such as removing clutter from your desktop, choosing the right paint colors or artwork, and keeping the right elemental balance of objects in your office all make a surprisingly large impact on your work day.
Imagine the desktop divided into a nine-part grid, as in the bagua map shown above. Choose several areas of your life that could use a little boost, and use the following tips to attract good energy to those areas. Each section is associated with a color, and you can use objects of that color if you have them. Just don’t go overboard—remember, clutter blocks creativity, so at least 50 percent of the desktop should be clear at all times. Don’t focus on all nine sections; instead, select two to three priorities.
Emma Lawson is a passionate writer, online article editor and a health enthusiast at High Style Life. In her spare time, she likes to do research, and write articles to create awareness regarding healthy lifestyle. She also strives to suggest innovative home remedies that can help you lead a quality and long life. Connect with @EmmahLawson on Twitter.
Dana Claudat is a modern feng shui master, designer, and founder of the blog The Tao of Dana. She is a Stanford-educated art historian with more than a decade of experience in design, feng shui, and research with thousands of clients, yet her approach to space is simple. Starting where you are, using what you have, you can create more of your dream home—and dream life—every day. Dana is a longtime mindbodygreen contributor and instructor (she may have had a hand in the hundreds of plants in mindbodygreen headquarters!), and her work has been featured in design and lifestyle publications around the world. You can work with Dana from wherever you are in the world in her online Feng Shui Camps and through her Online Feng Shui Consultations. For more art and feng shui lifestyle inspiration, you can follow Dana on Facebook and Instagram. Join in her weekly feng shui notes, including monthly New Moon Full Moon feng shui rituals, here!
Separating unfinished tasks from completed projects will help you
 gain control over workflow and improve your work focus and organization, and you can use different colored folders to classify files by date,
 status, or category. Once you’ve sorted out paperwork, put away the folders that can wait and concentrate on the files which need to be completed
 without delay.
Well, qi needs to flow harmoniously in order for you to be happy, and live in line with your desires. So, feng shui divides your environment – your entire home and each specific room – into eight areas. Within these areas, feng shui seeks to balance the five key elements of wood, fire, water, earth, and metal, in order to encourage positive energy to flow.
When you’re setting up your room (or cubicle), you'll want to first look at its layout. Is there an even distribution of furniture on both sides of the room? Is there art only on one wall, or is it sprinkled throughout the space? Is it too bright? Is it too minimalist? How balanced and even do you feel in your workspace? Where and how do things feel off?
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