You might also consider these hues too strong to use for an entire room. So Frampton counts foyers (like this poppy pink one, designed by Jonathan Berger) and hallways as the perfect places to try them. "A hallway should have a dynamic energy — it's circulating people through the space, it's all about movement," she says. "So express that with a dynamic color!"

So, there you have it, the basic feng shui color guide to help you create a happy and healthy home. Color is like music, nourishing and uplifting, and the more colors you harmoniously absorb throughout the day, the higher your sense of well-being. Do not be afraid to bring vibrant colors into your space, as color is light, and light is our number one nutrient.
Anjie Cho is the founder of Holistic Spaces and Anjie Cho Architect, integrating beauty, spirituality and green design. She creates and enhances balance and harmony by designing spaces with an understanding of sustainability and informed by the ancient practice of feng shui. Her focus is to create a nurturing and supportive environment for each of her clients. Anjie is a registered New York State Architect, Interior Designer, LEED Accredited Professional, and certified Feng Shui consultant. For over 14 years, she has been creating beautiful and nourishing environments. A graduate in Architecture from the University of California at Berkeley, Anjie is a sought-after expert in the fields of feng shui and green design.
So how is feng shui different from just getting organized or decorating better? “It goes beyond just decorating because feng shui has a psychological component to the principles, says Laura Cerrano of Feng Shui Manhattan. "Your surroundings have a deep and profound impact on your emotional, mental, physical, and spiritual well-being.” Since the daily nine-to-five makes up a big part of the day, improving the chi in the workspace will help you out at work and in the rest of your life.
Dana Claudat is a modern feng shui master, designer, and founder of the blog The Tao of Dana. She is a Stanford-educated art historian with more than a decade of experience in design, feng shui, and research with thousands of clients, yet her approach to space is simple. Starting where you are, using what you have, you can create more of your dream home—and dream life—every day. Dana is a longtime mindbodygreen contributor and instructor (she may have had a hand in the hundreds of plants in mindbodygreen headquarters!), and her work has been featured in design and lifestyle publications around the world. You can work with Dana from wherever you are in the world in her online Feng Shui Camps and through her Online Feng Shui Consultations. For more art and feng shui lifestyle inspiration, you can follow Dana on Facebook and Instagram. Join in her weekly feng shui notes, including monthly New Moon Full Moon feng shui rituals, here!
Kitchens hold special importance in the practice of Feng Shui, alongside bedrooms and entrances. Traditionally, they represent a place of nourishment and family. In an office setting, they are important because they offer employees a space to relax, regenerate and feed their mind. In Feng Shui, kitchens are ideally placed away from main entrances and bathrooms to promote good "chi". Changing the positioning of the kitchen in your office space may not be possible—but managers can use strategically placed furniture, greenery or art to liven up break areas.

When you work in a cubicle type office setting - which means that your office set-up cannot be changed - you have to pay even more attention to creating (and keeping) good energy throughout your day at the office. While you might not be able to move your office desk into a feng shui commanding position or face your lucky feng shui directions, but there are still many ways to improve the energy of your workspace. 
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