As the end of year approaches, it's often easy to feel overworked, sluggish, and a little deflated. You might secretly hope that the holiday break was already here, but despite your wishful thinking, the last quarter of the year is also often the busiest. Between holiday parties and social gatherings, you're also expected to tie all your loose ends before the year's end. Cue late nights at the office or working from your sofa or bed after dinner as you try to make it to the finish line.
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7. Accelerates Healing and Recovery Process. It turns out that hospital gardens bring natural medical benefits. Namely, it helps patients heal and recover faster. In a study conducted by HortTechnology, patients recovering from abdominal surgery in hospital rooms were tested. They found that the patients exposed to plants and hospital gardens had significantly fewer intakes of postoperative analgesics, more positive physiological responses, and more positive feelings.

The Golden Rooster or the Red Rooster is a lucky element for those who want to obtain a promotion. On the other hand, it is beneficial when placed in the office because it balances the energies, it improves communication and it helps to establish new contacts and relationships. Chinese people like to decorate it with lucky coins and to place it in the north or south side of the office.

Thanks for these informative posts. I have a choice to make between two tiny multi-person offices whose setup cannot be changed: a) windowless, and large closed bookshelf hangs above the desk; or b) desks face a huge window. In a), the door is to the side as one sits at the desk; in b), on sits with back to the door. I think a) is better, but the windowless factor is somehow off-putting. What would you suggest?


Symbolic for good luck and success due to their innate resilience, strength, and ability to grow quickly, the lucky bamboo plants attempt to balance the five natural feng shui elements in the home or office: wood, metal, earth, water, and fire. These five elements are represented, respectively, by the plant, glass vase or coin, rocks, water, and red ribbon. Lucky bamboo plants can be planted as stalks or grown into beautiful shapes such as pyramids.
Out of all possible materials—wood, glass, laminate, and metal—a wood desk is definitely the best feng shui choice. Not only it brings natural energy into your space, it also has both nourishing, as well as a vibrant quality of energy. If you want to understand deeper the feng shui properties of wood, look into the Wood feng shui element it represents.
To create a calming and safe environment for your clients, incorporate the five Chinese elements of wood, fire, earth, metal and water into the space your sessions take place. You can do this by bringing in decorations or furniture of each element. Or, you can accomplish this by strategically choosing a wall color that aligns with one of the five elements.
"Once you have a clearer vision for the function of your office and understand what pieces of furniture you need, you can establish the arrangement of furniture," says Cerrano. She recommends starting with the desk position and building outward from there. "Essentially, you are looking for the best commanding position, which allows the occupant to literally, energetically, and metaphorically see and feel who and what opportunities are approaching their life. Positioning your desk inside any office could symbolize avoiding collaborations with unbeneficial business partners and signing contracts or agreements that are one-sided."

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Hurrah! Spring is here! In feng shui philosophy, the spring season symbolizes new beginnings, growth, and expansion—like when the trees start to grow back their leaves. We use plants, the colors green and blue, as well as columnar and expansive shapes in feng shui to symbolize this type of energy. But in addition to making indoor spaces more attractive, did you know that houseplants also improve indoor air quality? Many houseplants remove harmful pollutants from the air that off gas from synthetic materials found in our buildings, furniture, and even clothing. These toxins can lead to poor health and low productivity. Adding plants to a space can also help create a softer and more vibrant energy, and they can heal us visually and physically—their natural green tones are relaxing and therapeutic. Now that the new season has sprung, infuse some positive energy into your home and adopt a houseplant this spring. Below are the three houseplants commonly used in feng shui adjustments.
Anjie Cho is the founder of Holistic Spaces and Anjie Cho Architect, integrating beauty, spirituality and green design. She creates and enhances balance and harmony by designing spaces with an understanding of sustainability and informed by the ancient practice of feng shui. Her focus is to create a nurturing and supportive environment for each of her clients. Anjie is a registered New York State Architect, Interior Designer, LEED Accredited Professional, and certified Feng Shui consultant. For over 14 years, she has been creating beautiful and nourishing environments. A graduate in Architecture from the University of California at Berkeley, Anjie is a sought-after expert in the fields of feng shui and green design.

If you work from home, you can apply many of the same principles of feng shui for offices that you would apply in any other work environment. Keep the entrance of your home neat, clean, and free of clutter. The same goes for the entrance to your office room. Even if you never meet clients in person at home, this is an important step in opening up the flow of energy and welcoming positive improvements to your work life.


If you have been neglecting your work environment, take some time now to pay attention to the feng shui of your office, and we mean really pay attention to what is going on in your workspace. Answer some basic feng shui questions, such as, for example: What is happening behind your back? What do you first see as you come in? What is the quality of the air you breathe in? The quality of light? 
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