When you’re setting up your room (or cubicle), you'll want to first look at its layout. Is there an even distribution of furniture on both sides of the room? Is there art only on one wall, or is it sprinkled throughout the space? Is it too bright? Is it too minimalist? How balanced and even do you feel in your workspace? Where and how do things feel off?
Out of all possible materials—wood, glass, laminate, and metal—a wood desk is definitely the best feng shui choice. Not only it brings natural energy into your space, it also has both nourishing, as well as a vibrant quality of energy. If you want to understand deeper the feng shui properties of wood, look into the Wood feng shui element it represents.
13. Add in an air-purifying plant or two. Offices are notorious for high EMF (electromagnetic field) devices, which sap energy and pollute the air. Air purifying plants will help to increase the oxygen available to your brain (a definite bonus while working, we can all agree) as well as refresh the space overall and keep positive energy levels high.

And, of course, because feng shui is all about energy, there is certainly a lot of emphasis on the actual energy of the plants, starting with their specific look and feel to one of the most important factors - their overall health. Having a popular feng shui plant such as the lucky bamboo, for example, struggling to survive, will be quite bad feng shui as compared to another plant with absolutely no specific feng shui reputation but with a vibrant, alive and joyful energy.

When it comes to desk materials, wood and metal are the best choice as they symbolize stability and peak mental performance. Glass desks and tables (like those offered by Lexus or Arkitek) on the other hand, symbolize transparency, but they also
 allow a faster energy flow, so be sure to coat them with wooden accessories or potted plants for a dose of stability. Laminate desks are energy neutral and
 won’t impact your performance significantly.


An important office feng shui guideline is to have your home office as far from your bedroom as possible. If the layout of your house allows, having a separate entrance to your home office is ideal. If this is not feasible, be sure to create as much division as possible between your office area and your bedroom; this is the basis of good home office feng shui.
Energy, or "chi" is one of the fundamental concepts in feng shui, and being able to increase the chi at your desk is important. More chi means greater prosperity and security for you, ensuring your success and happiness. Place an object in the wrong spot, and the chi is disrupted, and you will need to re-implement feng shui for the office desk at your office desk.
In Feng Shui art, it is recommended to place green plants in the office. They are valuable for health and work conditions because they bring positive energies and they increase the creative work and the productivity. The best plant for office is bamboo because it brings luck. Place the plants from east to south-east. Avoid cactuses, bonsai and sharp edged leaves plants.

According to feng shui expert RD Chin, people often turn to the practice if “they don’t feel right or comfortable in their space.” Perhaps nowhere is this more relevant than in the workspace—painful chairs, bad lighting, and a boss breathing down our necks hardly promote feelings of comfort. That’s where feng shui comes in. If you’re looking to feel a little more “at home” even while at work, or just want to send some good vibes your way on the job (promotion, anyone?), read on to find out how to use feng shui on your desk!
Houseplants can be an important Feng Shui tool to help activate positive energy in your home or office while they purify the air. Many people think that lucky bamboo is the only Feng Shui friendly houseplant, but there are actually many choices that can fit your décor. The best time to add a new plant is at the beginning of a new month or at the new year, when it symbolizes a healthy beginning for you and your family.

When you’re setting up your room (or cubicle), you'll want to first look at its layout. Is there an even distribution of furniture on both sides of the room? Is there art only on one wall, or is it sprinkled throughout the space? Is it too bright? Is it too minimalist? How balanced and even do you feel in your workspace? Where and how do things feel off?

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