The expert also warns against a workspace that serves multiple functions: "Another hiccup to the feng shui-ing process is sharing your home office with too many people. Learn to set healthy boundaries. I've had clients who shared their office file cabinet, desk, and other means of storage with their children. The result? Toys, drawings, and homework took over their office, creating a clutter of distraction with limited storage space."

"Going with an all-neutral theme can be beautiful and elegant," says Benko. "Just remember these two tips: An all-neutral palette feels richer and more balanced if you mix textures, such as a nubby throw, a course jute rug, a smooth stone-topped coffee table and a furry sheepskin rug. Think in layers. Adding in metallics kicks it all up a design notch and delivers a polished feel to the atmosphere."


The ideal office is a room of your own with a regular shape (preferably square or rectangle), natural lighting (at least one window), a solid door you can close, and a good position for your desk. One of the great advantages of having your own office is that you can usually perform more decorative Feng Shui adjustments than if you work in a cubicle. Of course, not every company can afford, or desires, to put every employee in his or her own individual space.
When you work in a cubicle type office setting - which means that your office set-up cannot be changed - you have to pay even more attention to creating (and keeping) good energy throughout your day at the office. While you might not be able to move your office desk into a feng shui commanding position or face your lucky feng shui directions, but there are still many ways to improve the energy of your workspace. 
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