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Hi, in my new shared dorm my desk is in the NE corner however their is a huge window that takes up basically the top half of the whole wall. Is it okay if my back is against the window so it faces the door or should i face it towards my bed so i turn my head right to look at the door and left at the window or should i face it towards the wall so i look left to the door and right to the window. My dorm room isnt the most ideal place for feng shui as it is my head is against a wall but right next to the window so i could look diagonally at the door and have a clear view of the whole room. Please help!
Dana Claudat is a modern feng shui master, designer, and founder of the blog The Tao of Dana. She is a Stanford-educated art historian with more than a decade of experience in design, feng shui, and research with thousands of clients, yet her approach to space is simple. Starting where you are, using what you have, you can create more of your dream home—and dream life—every day. Dana is a longtime mindbodygreen contributor and instructor (she may have had a hand in the hundreds of plants in mindbodygreen headquarters!), and her work has been featured in design and lifestyle publications around the world. You can work with Dana from wherever you are in the world in her online Feng Shui Camps and through her Online Feng Shui Consultations. For more art and feng shui lifestyle inspiration, you can follow Dana on Facebook and Instagram. Join in her weekly feng shui notes, including monthly New Moon Full Moon feng shui rituals, here!

Cultivating the West of your desk is imperative to stimulate creative ideas, and provocative, new solutions to propose everyday problems experienced by your department. (Guaranteed to impress your boss!) Despite whether or not your occupation is considered “creative,” heightening alternative thinking will open new door in every plane of your life, in and outside of the office.


As a rule of (green!) thumb, in feng shui we generally prefer plants with soft and rounded leaves. This shape offers a softer and gentler energy. Plants with sharp leaves, thorns, or spiky needles are best avoided for feng shui applications. That said, there are absolutely situations that they may be appropriate for. And if you already have such plants in your home this does not mean you need to remove them. For example, maybe you have a great attachment to a cactus that you received from your grandmother years ago. But in general if you want to add a plant into your home with a feng shui intention, go for something less prickly.
The jade plant is another plant commonly known as a money tree in feng shui because the round leaves symbolize good fortune. These plants are relatively hardy succulents, so they may be a better money tree choice for those challenged at keeping plants alive. Like the traditional money tree, jade plants are best placed in money, health, or fame areas of the home. You can also place them in an office space to invite success and fortune.
Outer offices: Large offices, especially high-rise offices often have a bank of windows along the outside wall. While it may be tempting to sit with your back to the windows, you will lack the support you need in your work. Place your desk so you have a solid wall behind you. Use a feng shui office layout for auspicious chi energy and success in your career.
However, using plants for feng shui can get tricky. You’ll need to factor in the five elements, the type of room, and the directions. It’s not easy, but that’s the only way you can apply feng shui in a holistic way to get the best results that you desired for. Of course, the alternative is to get help from a professional so you won’t overlook any important factors when you feng shui yourself.
That said, spending hours working from your couch on weeknights or at your kitchen island on Sunday mornings might not be the most productive thing to do. Studies conducted by Alan Hedge, Ph.D. and CPE at Cornell University, found that a comfortable working environment can do more than make workers happy: It can improve productivity as well. Just like new workout clothes can motivate us to hit the gym more often, an office space with good feng shui can help us work more efficiently.
Feng shui philosophy tells us to position the desk so that you are in command of the room. Essentially, this means your back shouldn't be facing the door. Beyond the biological aspect of feeling less innately safe with our back to the door, there’s a lot of feng shui lore about this position allowing for things to happen at work "behind your back."
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