In an open plan with many desks, use plants to soften sharp edges and corners. Sharp edges create “poison arrowsâ€? which contribute to conditions such as irritability, discomfort, and even disease to name a few! Also, the aisles should be large enough so that the energy moves slower. Make sure to use subtle colors in an open office plan. Bright, vivid colors are too active in a large bustling room.
6. Restroom. Using a person’s Kua, the restroom can be BOTH a good and a bad place for plants. Plants in a restroom located in an “inauspicious” or “unlucky” area have the ability to amplify the negative energy of that area. On the other hand, for restrooms in “auspicious” or “lucky” areas, plants have the ability to amplify the positive energy, which can counter the negative feng shui brought by the restroom.
If you’re sick you can’t work! Although it may be difficult for you embellish the center of your desk, I adorn my computer monitor with crystals like citrine and blue calcite, the first of which promotes energy and liveliness, the latter facilitates communication. Lack of communication is a common source of anxiety, depression, and physical unrest.
4. Use plants and essential oil. Low-maintenance plants such as bamboo or philodendrons help to clean the air, make breathing easier, and add a vibrant life force to the space. Aromatherapy can also help elevate your energy and productivity. Benko suggests placing a bottle of lemon oil on your desk and taking a whiff when you feel uninspired. "Lemon makes you feel more motivated and uplifts your spirits," she says.

It’s said that the practice of feng shui decorating encourages good chi—also known as positive energy—to flow smoothly through a room, which in turn benefits its occupants. The better the chi, the more cleansing and positive experience your clients will have in counseling. While every room could use feng shui, it is particularly useful in a private practice where clients are coming in for help. The more positive energy, the better!

I rent a small room in a condo. Everything I do is in this room. I have a home business as an editor and writer. My desk is in the southeast corner, the only place it can be, and I sit facing a wall next to the window, with my back to the door. I have an oblong mirror I’m thinking of hanging on the wall in front of me to reflect the door behind me. Turning the desk around so I can see the door would be awkward space-wise. And what should I put on the desk? It’s actually a table. Thank you.
Soft yellow, sandstone, pale gold, pale orange, pale green, and blue-green are always appropriate feng shui office colors. Adding white will increase clarity and mental focus. Browns and earth tones will ground and stabilize the office, however, they don’t stimulate mind. Read more about color psychology here. You can also choose colors based on yin/yan or feng shui element principles to create balance.
When it comes to the link between colors and performance, Feng
 Shui distinguishes between tones which stimulate the mind (gray, white, and muted shades) and those that invigorate the body (brown and bright hues). For
 this reason, medium-toned wooden desks are considered the best office option as they provide optimal contrast and minimal distraction.
According to feng shui, a room's color should be in accordance with the cardinal direction it faces. But how do you find that out? "In order to properly assess this direction, stand in the center of your home and with the aid of a compass, find the direction of your home office. Then, choose colors harmonious with that direction." Ready to find the paint color for your workspace that will bring you productivity and prosperity? Brown gives us the lowdown on feng shui office colors according to their cardinal direction.
The placement of desks in a space can have a large effect on your staff's work output. The arrangement can affect everything from exposure to natural light to a staff member's perspective on the whole office. Feng Shui practices recommend placing desks in positions that face the entry point of the room. Placing staff in front of walls or dividers can hinder creativity and block inspiration. Instead, placing desks so staff members have a wide view of the room with their backs facing a wall can improve a sense of trust in the space. This is considered the "command position" that allows a person to feel a sense of control over their own environment.
Get rid of the nonessentials in every cranny—this includes those drawers you rarely open. Clutter (even the clutter that's hidden away) keeps your work feeling stuck. This includes digital clutter and scheduling clutter, too! You may want to try to spend time every day looking over your schedule and visualizing what’s to come, clearing away or canceling anything that’s unnecessary, and preparing for the day to flow more smoothly.
×