Did you know that, according to feng shui, choosing the best paint color for a room all depends on where it's located in your home? We didn't either, that is until we spoke with feng shui expert Robert Brown, MD, author of Toxic Home/Conscious Home. Having studied mindfulness at home at length and in a holistic way, Brown knows exactly how to apply feng shui principles to achieve a healthy and happy home.
In feng shui, lucky bamboo is ideal when it’s straight. Sometimes you see the curly or twisted versions, which actually represent the opposite of upright and positive growth, such as spinning and downward spiraling energy. I love using lucky bamboo for feng shui applications because they can thrive in a variety of lighting conditions, in water or in soil, and are easy to find.
Of course, fire is the most powerful element and should be used with caution so that no one gets burned. This is true in both the literal and figurative sense with Feng Shui office designs since using actual fire elements can often be dangerous. Therefore, you can use red objects to represent the fire element and should be place in the south section of the room, office space, or building. Lamps and unique lighting can also be used to represent fire elements for the office.

"Overall, create an environment that highlights you professionally and personally," recommends Cerrano. "Your selection of décor on a subconscious level is an energetic extension of what you are attracting. For example, when I first started my business, I knew my main clients would be from the New York region, yet I was curious in extending my feng shui consulting firm to reach national and international clientele. To align that intention with the surroundings of my home office, I chose to display an antique world map. Within a short period of time, I began attracting clients beyond the New York border."

Crystals such as Tourmaline or Clear Quartz should be placed at the right-hand corner of your desk. This helps you to breakdown the stressful energies at work. It can also reduce attacks from ‘tricky’ people or those who may want to con you. They can also attract benefactors to assist you in your work. Remember to cleanse the crystals regularly to keep them at their most effective.
The image to the left is a good example of a balanced environment. It has characteristics of all five feng shui elements. The wood element can be seen in the soaring vertical window treatments. The earth element is represented by the horizontal, rectangular furniture as well as the earthy colors and pottery. The fire element is brought in through the natural and artificial lighting and the antler base of the lamp. Finally, the water element can be seen in the mirror and asymmetrical shapes.
i have my stairs in the almost north eastern corner, where I have placed small plants and at the entrance I have placed palms and Christmas tree which are big in size that too is a north eastern part of my house, and I do not have any place except these two to place plants as my house is very small, please guide because I love plants very much and do not want to remove them, please help.
But when you follow this guide, you'll end up with colors that fit just right — they'll help your house work exactly as it should, and make you feel right at home. We tapped Laura Benko, holistic Feng Shui expert and author of The Holistic Home: Feng Shui Your Mind, Body, Spirit, Space, and New York-based interior designer Elena Frampton, who's been a Feng Shui hobbyist since she was a teen, for their most thoughtful advice on the subject. Consider this the color primer you've been waiting for — even if you don't think you're the Feng Shui "type."
Benko recalls a client whose family photo was hindering rather than inspiring her. Even though the photo was taken during a vacation, the client revealed it was a very stressful time. "The kids were hungry and they felt forced to pose for the picture, so every time she looked at that picture, subconsciously she was feeling the stress and anxiety of that moment," says Benko.
When you’re setting up your room (or cubicle), you'll want to first look at its layout. Is there an even distribution of furniture on both sides of the room? Is there art only on one wall, or is it sprinkled throughout the space? Is it too bright? Is it too minimalist? How balanced and even do you feel in your workspace? Where and how do things feel off?
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