Start by considering how you can introduce the five elements of Feng Shui—wood, fire, earth, metal and water—into your space. Incorporating moving water into the workplace helps add a natural component to a room and is said to pool positive energy that ultimately brings success. Managers can incorporate a fountain in their workplace to improve wellness and promote biophilic design. Fountains that are placed in northern facing portions of the room are said to improve prosperity—entrances and exits are also important areas to consider when positioning water elements.
Feng shui isn’t a magic formula; rather, it provides a visual reminder of the areas of life that you value or are working to improve. Chin notes that feng shui is a “matter of perspective, a way of thinking or creating balance in our lives.” Start by following the guidelines above as a way to add positivity and balance to your desk—and to your life!
If you are not feeling quite right in your office, it could be time for a feng shui overhaul. Feng shui is an ancient Chinese system to help organize your life to promote the flow of energy. Applying these principles to your office will help increase productivity lower stress. Simple things such as removing clutter from your desktop, choosing the right paint colors or artwork, and keeping the right elemental balance of objects in your office all make a surprisingly large impact on your work day.

Home Feng Shui is essential but we also cannot forget about the office Feng Shui too. Why? Office is considered our second home since we usually spend around 8 hours or more daily there, so keeping out for the Feng Shui Do’s and Don’ts is essential too. We will share some tips for office Feng Shui here and hope you will benefit from them and be more happy.
find your flow. when it comes to career energy, moving water represents prosperity, abundance, and steady flow. you can bring this in with actual water – fresh flowers (change the water regularly), a fountain, or a coffee maker – or imagery of moving water. do yourself a solid, though, and make sure the WATER moves into your space. if the water “flows” toward the door, so will all that potential do(ugh) ray me.
De-cluttering is not directly included in the ancient principles of Feng Shui, but it is often mentioned due to its effect on energy within a space. Clutter in the office can negatively impact your staff's energy and workflow and impede performance. On the other hand, having a clean, clear desk can help employees stay focused on the tasks at hand. Keeping the office clutter-free promotes productivity, ensures the space is presentable to clients and comes with the added benefit of freeing up more usable space in the office.
North area (Career or Path in Life). The feng shui element here is Water, so this is the feng shui area for items representing water, as well as Metal (Metal creates Water in the feng shui 5 elements cycle.) Without making it sound too complicated, you can place inspiring images related to your career in black or white frame colors in the North area of your home office.
As the end of year approaches, it's often easy to feel overworked, sluggish, and a little deflated. You might secretly hope that the holiday break was already here, but despite your wishful thinking, the last quarter of the year is also often the busiest. Between holiday parties and social gatherings, you're also expected to tie all your loose ends before the year's end. Cue late nights at the office or working from your sofa or bed after dinner as you try to make it to the finish line.
Anjie Cho is the founder of Holistic Spaces and Anjie Cho Architect, integrating beauty, spirituality and green design. She creates and enhances balance and harmony by designing spaces with an understanding of sustainability and informed by the ancient practice of feng shui. Her focus is to create a nurturing and supportive environment for each of her clients. Anjie is a registered New York State Architect, Interior Designer, LEED Accredited Professional, and certified Feng Shui consultant. For over 14 years, she has been creating beautiful and nourishing environments. A graduate in Architecture from the University of California at Berkeley, Anjie is a sought-after expert in the fields of feng shui and green design.

As with one of the meanings of “earth” this element can help you stay grounded and stable. It also is said to create grounds for stable relationships as well as job stability. Designs with earthly tones (light browns, yellows, oranges and sandy colors) will help you especially when used in the center of the office. Paintings of landscapes can represent the earth element so can ceramic or clay decorations.
It gives best results in the loose soil with a lot of drainage holes and hence, while planting, ensure that the pot has enough drainage facilities. Keep watering the plants regularly without fail. In between the watering, look after the fact that avoids drying of the top soil.  As it prefers indirect sunlight, people should keep the plant away from the direct sunlight. It requires the temperature between 65 to 70 degrees to grow well.

"In the bedroom, make it work by adding patterns into the mix, or painting only one wall black — the one behind the bed, as a grounding element," Frampton explains. Or add some luminosity, as seen here in a New York City kitchen Frampton designed: "This backsplash has an iridescent quality — as you move, the light catches it. That counteracts that black and softens the whole look."
When choosing the colors for your office, you can either go with the elemental guide above or choose a general, lighter color. Yellow, sandstone, pale gold, or green work well. If you want to ground or stabilize, you can choose browns or other earth tones. For large offices with open floor plans, it is important to have subtle colors. When you try to incorporate a bright color in a large active room, it can become too distracting and more stressful.
There are a few feng shui principles you can follow to bring more energy into your space. "Make sure you have good air circulation," says Cerrano. "When the weather is good, feel free to open up the windows, and if you can't, consider looking into purchasing an air purifier (especially if your home office has no windows). Do your best to avoid locating your home office in the basement." Allowing natural light to penetrate into the office is proven to increase productivity, according to a study from Northwestern Medicine and the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. "On that note, if you are able to establish a commanding position that allows you to be supported by a solid wall, see the office doorway with no obstructions, and have a view of the outside, it's a triple win."
I was initially leery about Feng Shui until a friend swore things changed after reading Lillian Too's Living with Good Feng Shui book and applying it into her day-to-day life. Googled it and found a copy from Noon Books (www.noon-books.com). I thoroughly enjoyed reading it, applying it and waiting for positive results. I swear life seems to just "flow" now instead of just "chug along" if you know what I mean. Money comes in from unexpected sources and relationships seem to require no effort. Life just seems happier. I can't explain it, but it works. I guess at the end of the day that's what it all boils down to. Super thankful I stumbled upon this and gave it a chance.
14. In keeping with the habit of feng shui strategies, be sure to keep your office organized and free of clutter. Clutter saps your energy and your motivation, while a clean and organized space increases your efficiency, enthusiasm, and overall work energy. The free flow of chi will be enhanced significantly without clutter (including electronics cords).
If your table is facing a doorway, walk path or corridor, make sure you have a mini partition to block the direct energies that may affect you. Corridors and doorway openings have a form of fast moving energy. There energies may distract you so that you can’t fully concentrate on your work. Make sure to have a small blockade or wall that ensures you can’t easily see the doorway or corridor infront of you.  If it is your own business or office premise, you can put up curtains as well (simple and effective).
One of the basic tools for a feng shui practitioner is the bagua map. It’s a nine-part grid depicting the different areas of a space (home, desk, office, what have you) and how they correspond to different areas of life. Think of it as a general blueprint for any feng shui endeavor. To let the positive energy flow, follow the basic guidelines below.
De-cluttering is not directly included in the ancient principles of Feng Shui, but it is often mentioned due to its effect on energy within a space. Clutter in the office can negatively impact your staff's energy and workflow and impede performance. On the other hand, having a clean, clear desk can help employees stay focused on the tasks at hand. Keeping the office clutter-free promotes productivity, ensures the space is presentable to clients and comes with the added benefit of freeing up more usable space in the office.

Energy, or "chi" is one of the fundamental concepts in feng shui, and being able to increase the chi at your desk is important. More chi means greater prosperity and security for you, ensuring your success and happiness. Place an object in the wrong spot, and the chi is disrupted, and you will need to re-implement feng shui for the office desk at your office desk.


The wood element colors of green and tan (light browns) are ideal for an east (health luck) or southeast (wealth luck) office since the wood element governs both sectors. In addition, wood fuels fire, so be sure to add splashes of green and brown in a southern office. You may decide to go strictly with these colors for a southern office décor. Blue and green are good color combinations for east and southeast since the water element (blue) nurtures wood (green).
Benko recalls a client whose family photo was hindering rather than inspiring her. Even though the photo was taken during a vacation, the client revealed it was a very stressful time. "The kids were hungry and they felt forced to pose for the picture, so every time she looked at that picture, subconsciously she was feeling the stress and anxiety of that moment," says Benko.
When you’re setting up your room (or cubicle), you'll want to first look at its layout. Is there an even distribution of furniture on both sides of the room? Is there art only on one wall, or is it sprinkled throughout the space? Is it too bright? Is it too minimalist? How balanced and even do you feel in your workspace? Where and how do things feel off?
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