According to feng shui expert RD Chin, people often turn to the practice if “they don’t feel right or comfortable in their space.” Perhaps nowhere is this more relevant than in the workspace—painful chairs, bad lighting, and a boss breathing down our necks hardly promote feelings of comfort. That’s where feng shui comes in. If you’re looking to feel a little more “at home” even while at work, or just want to send some good vibes your way on the job (promotion, anyone?), read on to find out how to use feng shui on your desk!
If you are hoping for a raise or looking to close a big business deal, metal elements should be put in the western corner of the room and can be used to bring on an increase in financial success, income, or profits. Metal objects can be made of metal or just colored to represent them. Design elements made of stone, metals, or marble will give the impression of professionalism and success.
It’s said that the practice of feng shui decorating encourages good chi—also known as positive energy—to flow smoothly through a room, which in turn benefits its occupants. The better the chi, the more cleansing and positive experience your clients will have in counseling. While every room could use feng shui, it is particularly useful in a private practice where clients are coming in for help. The more positive energy, the better!
Feng shui philosophy tells us to position the desk so that you are in command of the room. Essentially, this means your back shouldn't be facing the door. Beyond the biological aspect of feeling less innately safe with our back to the door, there’s a lot of feng shui lore about this position allowing for things to happen at work "behind your back."
"In the bedroom, make it work by adding patterns into the mix, or painting only one wall black — the one behind the bed, as a grounding element," Frampton explains. Or add some luminosity, as seen here in a New York City kitchen Frampton designed: "This backsplash has an iridescent quality — as you move, the light catches it. That counteracts that black and softens the whole look."
When you’re setting up your room (or cubicle), you'll want to first look at its layout. Is there an even distribution of furniture on both sides of the room? Is there art only on one wall, or is it sprinkled throughout the space? Is it too bright? Is it too minimalist? How balanced and even do you feel in your workspace? Where and how do things feel off?
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