One of the criteria that the feng shui expert recommends for establishing a commanding position is to have a solid wall supporting you. "Using a visual cue, think of the solid wall as a mountain protecting your back. Remember, be flexible in how you interpret the feng shui principles." For example, if your floor plan only allows a desk position where your back is supported by a window, Cerrano recommends adding a few plants along the window sill or behind your desk. "The main characteristic of plants (also known as the wood element) is to offer support. Again, this is a general guideline because you need to become acquainted with your office to see what areas allow for the best commanding position and proceed from there."
I personally have doubts on how items can help with Feng Shui. The important thing is to be aware that the Feng Shui will affect your relationship (assuming you did your Feng Shui audit and analysis correctly). If you’re aware, you can make strides to make improvements and weather the storm. See “Human Luck” for reference here: https://fengshuinexus.com/blog/cosmic-trinity-feng-shuis-influence-limitations/
If you have to share your office space with another, you should try to avoid sitting back to back. It is also best to avoid sitting face to face. Both positions tend to create conflict. If you can’t avoid sitting face to face, either stagger the desks or create a small barrier with a plant, photo or other object. Concentrate on acoustical privacy—use headphones and muffle phone conversations.
The surface of your desk can also be arranged according to feng shui’s bagua. This is essentially a map that can be applied to the surface of your desk just as it would be applied to the floor plan of a home or office. Different areas of the bagua are associated with different areas of your life, and you can focus in on specific areas that need a little bit of a boost.
You would welcome a blast of positive energy at work. Feng Shui has been around a very long time and maybe there is something to it. At the very least, it asks you to think about what matters to you in life and where your energy should be focussed. When you consider how much time most of us spend at our your desks, a bit of balance with our true priorities might be just what we need.
When you’re setting up your room (or cubicle), you'll want to first look at its layout. Is there an even distribution of furniture on both sides of the room? Is there art only on one wall, or is it sprinkled throughout the space? Is it too bright? Is it too minimalist? How balanced and even do you feel in your workspace? Where and how do things feel off?
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