Hi, in my new shared dorm my desk is in the NE corner however their is a huge window that takes up basically the top half of the whole wall. Is it okay if my back is against the window so it faces the door or should i face it towards my bed so i turn my head right to look at the door and left at the window or should i face it towards the wall so i look left to the door and right to the window. My dorm room isnt the most ideal place for feng shui as it is my head is against a wall but right next to the window so i could look diagonally at the door and have a clear view of the whole room. Please help!
And, of course, because feng shui is all about energy, there is certainly a lot of emphasis on the actual energy of the plants, starting with their specific look and feel to one of the most important factors - their overall health. Having a popular feng shui plant such as the lucky bamboo, for example, struggling to survive, will be quite bad feng shui as compared to another plant with absolutely no specific feng shui reputation but with a vibrant, alive and joyful energy.
The ideal office is a room of your own with a regular shape (preferably square or rectangle), natural lighting (at least one window), a solid door you can close, and a good position for your desk. One of the great advantages of having your own office is that you can usually perform more decorative Feng Shui adjustments than if you work in a cubicle. Of course, not every company can afford, or desires, to put every employee in his or her own individual space.
Yes, your Feng Shui instincts are excellent — I would definitely suggest placing a mountain behind you to place something between you and the window panes. One of my favorite additional adjustments in cases like this is to hang a protective textile over the back of your chair. Use something that has dark, grounding earth tones like golden brown; it will make you feel more secure immediately.
In feng shui, lucky bamboo is ideal when it’s straight. Sometimes you see the curly or twisted versions, which actually represent the opposite of upright and positive growth, such as spinning and downward spiraling energy. I love using lucky bamboo for feng shui applications because they can thrive in a variety of lighting conditions, in water or in soil, and are easy to find.

After you map out the sections, ask yourself which parts of your life and/or business are most important to you or perhaps need some more attention. If there is any specific section you want to focus on in your life, try putting items that promote that related section of the bagua map. For instance, if you want to focus on your family, add a photo of them or place a plant in the “Family & Community” section.


When you’re setting up your room (or cubicle), you'll want to first look at its layout. Is there an even distribution of furniture on both sides of the room? Is there art only on one wall, or is it sprinkled throughout the space? Is it too bright? Is it too minimalist? How balanced and even do you feel in your workspace? Where and how do things feel off?

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