A cubicle is a much trickier Feng Shui situation than an office room. Cubicles are unfortunate paradigms of vulnerability for the individual worker. One of the chief problems is that you don’t use a real desk but work from a countertop, unless you work in one of the large manager type cubicles. However, you can do plenty to improve your situation. By judiciously applying Feng Shui cures, you may find yourself in your own office sooner than you imagined. (See Figure 1 for cure placements.)
In an open plan with many desks, use plants to soften sharp edges and corners. Sharp edges create “poison arrowsâ€? which contribute to conditions such as irritability, discomfort, and even disease to name a few! Also, the aisles should be large enough so that the energy moves slower. Make sure to use subtle colors in an open office plan. Bright, vivid colors are too active in a large bustling room.

every office + creative space has the potential to help us stage our own success. and when our personal working environment looks and feels connected to the reality of success, it punctuates our ambitions with an exclamation point. so, whether you’ve started a new job or are ready to “take off” professionally, here are 9 ways to shui your office like a boss:
Crafting some sort of meditative space—be it your desk chair, a floor cushion, a sofa, or a beanbag—is always worth it. Not only will it encourage you to practice more meditation, but it can remind you to circle back to that calm place during stressful workdays. Your favorite coffee mug, a family photo, or an inspiring book can also do the trick to help you feel more settled and relaxed in your space.
1. Do your best not to overwhelm your home and office with too many plants. Looking to the five element theory of feng shui, we are always establishing a harmonious connection with all the elements. If you have too many plants, this could produce the opposite effect of ‘growing’ and stagnant the energy flow. In regard to how a person could react to that energy they may feel; sluggish, impatient, slow and inflexible.
When you’re setting up your room (or cubicle), you'll want to first look at its layout. Is there an even distribution of furniture on both sides of the room? Is there art only on one wall, or is it sprinkled throughout the space? Is it too bright? Is it too minimalist? How balanced and even do you feel in your workspace? Where and how do things feel off?
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