I have a full length double mirror in my home office. I cannot cover it. It reflects my desk but i have nowhere else to place my desk where it does not reflect it, however i am not facing the mirror it is to the left of my desk and chair. Is there something i can do to improve the problem. I also have a window behind me at the desk and no room to place a plant or artwork as it is a full wall window and small room, i have thick red draps as it is also my fame bagua, is there anything else i can do to improve this problem? Also, moving my desk means my back is facing the door. Thanking you.

5. Underneath Beams. Beams are known for their bad feng shui because they bring suppressing Qi (think of the trapped-feeling you get when you enter a place with very low ceilings). That is why feng shui suggest that you avoid sleeping, working, or resting under beams. Placing large tree-like plants underneath the beam is said to help a little, as its upward growth is said to counter the beam’s suppressing Qi.
Plants may be just one element of Feng Shui; however, they can play a major role in office environments. Plants can buffer noise in an office increasing the amount of privacy felt in open floor plans. Plants, in general are known to make people happy and more creative, although this might be intangible, the extra added health benefits of having plants in an office are not. Plants increase oxygenation and filter out impurities in the air reducing the amount of bacteria and germs that are usually present in any shared environment. Therefore, office spaces with plants statistically have fewer employees that need to take sick leave. See here for 10 peaceful plants for Feng Shui.
Take a look at a list of 10 plants that were defined by NASA research in the early 1980s as species with good air-purifying qualities. These plants continue to do a fine job of air purification. Common airborne toxins and pollutants in the home that plants can scrub from the air include benzene, formaldehyde, and trichloroethylene, xylene, and ammonia.
Soft yellow, sandstone, pale gold, pale orange, pale green, and blue-green are always appropriate feng shui office colors. Adding white will increase clarity and mental focus. Browns and earth tones will ground and stabilize the office, however, they don’t stimulate mind. Read more about color psychology here. You can also choose colors based on yin/yan or feng shui element principles to create balance.
In a counseling practice, it’s important your clients feel comfortable and safe in your office, which is why you purchased those extra plush seats, stocked the space with tissues, and hung calming paintings on the wall. You even bring in healthy snacks to keep in your waiting room. But how much thought have you given to the color you painted on those walls? When you rent or lease a space, it’s likely you use whatever color is already on the walls. Even if you recently purchased space for a new practice, changing the wall color may be the very last item on your to-do list. However, it’s time to rethink that decision and use feng shui office colors as the base for decorating your space.
Feng shui philosophy tells us to position the desk so that you are in command of the room. Essentially, this means your back shouldn't be facing the door. Beyond the biological aspect of feeling less innately safe with our back to the door, there’s a lot of feng shui lore about this position allowing for things to happen at work "behind your back."
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