The jade plant is another plant commonly known as a money tree in feng shui because the round leaves symbolize good fortune. These plants are relatively hardy succulents, so they may be a better money tree choice for those challenged at keeping plants alive. Like the traditional money tree, jade plants are best placed in money, health, or fame areas of the home. You can also place them in an office space to invite success and fortune.
Any office environment can become hectic or stressful at times, making it important to find ways to make the space as calming as possible. One of the more subtle, yet effective ways to accomplish this is by painting the walls based on the principles of feng shui. The practice of feng shui revolves around the arrangement of your immediate environment in a manner that allows good chi (positive energy) to flow smoothly throughout the room, thereby nourishing its occupants. By creating a color scheme based on these principles utilizing the five Chinese elements of wood, fire, earth, metal and water, you can help to create a calming environment in your office or energize your employees.

You may find it strange to introduce spirituality into the workplace- but appealing to all planes of human wellness is imperative for improving your performance entirely. You may purchase a calendar of daily devotionals, or draw Oracle cards in the morning to keep yourself abreast of the challenges and successes of the day ahead. When you are centered within yourself, there exists nothing powerful enough to unground you.
Make sure that your desk or work space isn’t facing any sharp corners or edges. Such as pillars, other buildings or walls and so on. These sharp edges can invite in negative energy. They will cause migraines, headaches, pressure and unhappiness for yourself and others. Keep your desk facing a different way or try to put up a blockade or something between your desk and the sharp edge or corner if you can’t move it.  If it is truly unavoidable and you feel uncomfortable, place a bowl of salt or a salt lamp between you and the sharp corners to minimize pressure and “Sha Qi”.
When you’re setting up your room (or cubicle), you'll want to first look at its layout. Is there an even distribution of furniture on both sides of the room? Is there art only on one wall, or is it sprinkled throughout the space? Is it too bright? Is it too minimalist? How balanced and even do you feel in your workspace? Where and how do things feel off?
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