Houseplants can be an important Feng Shui tool to help activate positive energy in your home or office while they purify the air. Many people think that lucky bamboo is the only Feng Shui friendly houseplant, but there are actually many choices that can fit your décor. The best time to add a new plant is at the beginning of a new month or at the new year, when it symbolizes a healthy beginning for you and your family.

If you definitely can’t move your sitting position, you can place an 8-x-10-inch mirror in a picture frame or on a small stand to reflect the entrance of the cube to allow you to see if anyone is approaching. Many people subconsciously use the reflections in their computer monitor to see who’s approaching them, because seeing the entrance is a basic human need. The problem is that the reflection in a monitor’s screen is distorted, unclear, and unreliable.

In feng shui, lucky bamboo is ideal when it’s straight. Sometimes you see the curly or twisted versions, which actually represent the opposite of upright and positive growth, such as spinning and downward spiraling energy. I love using lucky bamboo for feng shui applications because they can thrive in a variety of lighting conditions, in water or in soil, and are easy to find.
Never ever sit with your back to the door. This is a big feng shui don't. The reason is you can't see what's coming up behind you. You could become the victim of office politics and backstabbing. If the configuration of your office is a cubicle and not something you can control, then place a mirror on your desk so it reflects what's directly behind you. This way you won't be startled or blindsighted by unexpected business turns.
One of the basic tools for a feng shui practitioner is the bagua map. It’s a nine-part grid depicting the different areas of a space (home, desk, office, what have you) and how they correspond to different areas of life. Think of it as a general blueprint for any feng shui endeavor. To let the positive energy flow, follow the basic guidelines below.

Thanks for the tip. In my office, we do not have the freedom to choose and shift our desk. So it ended up that this newcomer’s desk was place directly opposite mine and I can immediately feel the fengshui went wrong. I was looking up on what to do since there is no choice about moving desk (we had very limited space) and will definitely try place the barrier (probably use the portable whiteboard and putting plants on my desk)


Feng shui philosophy tells us to position the desk so that you are in command of the room. Essentially, this means your back shouldn't be facing the door. Beyond the biological aspect of feeling less innately safe with our back to the door, there’s a lot of feng shui lore about this position allowing for things to happen at work "behind your back."

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