I rent a small room in a condo. Everything I do is in this room. I have a home business as an editor and writer. My desk is in the southeast corner, the only place it can be, and I sit facing a wall next to the window, with my back to the door. I have an oblong mirror I’m thinking of hanging on the wall in front of me to reflect the door behind me. Turning the desk around so I can see the door would be awkward space-wise. And what should I put on the desk? It’s actually a table. Thank you.
Houseplants can be an important Feng Shui tool to help activate positive energy in your home or office while they purify the air. Many people think that lucky bamboo is the only Feng Shui friendly houseplant, but there are actually many choices that can fit your décor. The best time to add a new plant is at the beginning of a new month or at the new year, when it symbolizes a healthy beginning for you and your family.
The ideal office is a room of your own with a regular shape (preferably square or rectangle), natural lighting (at least one window), a solid door you can close, and a good position for your desk. One of the great advantages of having your own office is that you can usually perform more decorative Feng Shui adjustments than if you work in a cubicle. Of course, not every company can afford, or desires, to put every employee in his or her own individual space.
In feng shui, lucky bamboo is ideal when it’s straight. Sometimes you see the curly or twisted versions, which actually represent the opposite of upright and positive growth, such as spinning and downward spiraling energy. I love using lucky bamboo for feng shui applications because they can thrive in a variety of lighting conditions, in water or in soil, and are easy to find.
As a rule of (green!) thumb, in feng shui we generally prefer plants with soft and rounded leaves. This shape offers a softer and gentler energy. Plants with sharp leaves, thorns, or spiky needles are best avoided for feng shui applications. That said, there are absolutely situations that they may be appropriate for. And if you already have such plants in your home this does not mean you need to remove them. For example, maybe you have a great attachment to a cactus that you received from your grandmother years ago. But in general if you want to add a plant into your home with a feng shui intention, go for something less prickly.
You can use the typical feng shui cures for each specific area, or come up with your own creative solutions. For example, we mentioned the light source to your left—upper left—which is an excellent feng shui cure for the wealth area. A vibrant plant to your left or a family photo is excellent feng shui for health. A photo of you and your beloved or a couple of crystals can be great feng shui for your love area.
It’s said that the practice of feng shui decorating encourages good chi—also known as positive energy—to flow smoothly through a room, which in turn benefits its occupants. The better the chi, the more cleansing and positive experience your clients will have in counseling. While every room could use feng shui, it is particularly useful in a private practice where clients are coming in for help. The more positive energy, the better!
Houseplants can be an important Feng Shui tool to help activate positive energy in your home or office while they purify the air. Many people think that lucky bamboo is the only Feng Shui friendly houseplant, but there are actually many choices that can fit your décor. The best time to add a new plant is at the beginning of a new month or at the new year, when it symbolizes a healthy beginning for you and your family.
The "wealthy" plants in feng shui are not particularly air-cleaning, but they are gorgeous and great for anchoring your intention in a room. Some of the more wealth-symbolic plants are succulents, jade, and "lucky" bamboo. That being said, if a plant, tree, or anything symbolic chosen for "feng shui" reasons doesn’t inspire you, it’s not really worth getting. Let love rule your plant choices.
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