Projecting corner, post, pillar, column, soffit, or duct work: Many offices contain features that break up the energy flow of the room or, worse, shoot “poison arrows” at your sitting position at the desk. Place a sizeable plant in front of the troublesome feature, or hang a faceted crystal sphere between the feature and your sitting position at the desk.
Citrus and limes are considered symbols of good health, longevity, wealth, and prosperity. Along with the lucky bamboo and money plants, decorating a citrus or lime in the home during the Chinese New Year is said to foster good fortune for the family and business in the upcoming year. Citrus and limes are frequently grown as a bonsai or bought as artificial plants.
You might also consider these hues too strong to use for an entire room. So Frampton counts foyers (like this poppy pink one, designed by Jonathan Berger) and hallways as the perfect places to try them. "A hallway should have a dynamic energy — it's circulating people through the space, it's all about movement," she says. "So express that with a dynamic color!"
Chlorophytum comosum is a flowering perennial herb which falls in asparagaceae plants family, native to southern Africa. It is popular houseplant commonly known as spider plant. It is hardy, easy to care, requires less frequent watering, once in couple of months when it is placed in temperature between 15 -22 degree celsius. Spider plant was part of NASA study and found effective in cleaning formaldehyde, xylene and toluene. It improves indoor air quality and reduces stress, a report published by the university’s Cooperative Extension Service cited spider plant as one of the top varieties for removing VOCs and other pollutants from indoor air.
"A lot of people see white as a neutral, but in Feng Shui it's often perceived as very sharp," says Frampton. "If I'm looking for the fresh crispness of a white, I'll go with a darker white or very light gray instead," she explains, and suggests Benjamin Moore Gray Owl. "It's a super-soft gray that can read as the right kind of white. We use that one all the time."

Wealth and Prosperity The back left corner of the desk represents prosperity. Target this space to attract money and abundance. It’s a great place for a plant, but if your green thumb is more on the brown side, consider placing a valuable item (such as a crystal vase or jar of change) in this corner. This could also be a good spot for a (well-functioning) computer.


Thanks, Victor! The kitchen is in the front of the house and the house does actually face northeast. If the kitchen is not “draining away career luck” per what I read, what feng shui elements can enhance career? Interestingly, our front door opens to a split staircase, i.e., the right hand stir case going up to the main living area and the left hand stair case going down to the basement.
You can apply the classical principles of feng shui to other objects, such as your desk, in addition to the office itself. To start, be sure to place your desk so that it faces the door, as this will symbolize your ability to see opportunities and seize them when they arrive. If you work from home, this is a lot easier to accomplish because you will not have a boss telling you whether or not you can move your desk around. But if this is not possible at all, whether you work from home or not, place a mirror on your desk that gives you a view of the doorway in order to generate the same beneficial effects.

In an open plan with many desks, use plants to soften sharp edges and corners. Sharp edges create “poison arrowsâ€? which contribute to conditions such as irritability, discomfort, and even disease to name a few! Also, the aisles should be large enough so that the energy moves slower. Make sure to use subtle colors in an open office plan. Bright, vivid colors are too active in a large bustling room.
It’s said that the practice of feng shui decorating encourages good chi—also known as positive energy—to flow smoothly through a room, which in turn benefits its occupants. The better the chi, the more cleansing and positive experience your clients will have in counseling. While every room could use feng shui, it is particularly useful in a private practice where clients are coming in for help. The more positive energy, the better!
Bamboo is a plant that is abundant in Asia and grows very quickly. It represents upright and honest growth, as well as flexibility and adaptability. Since the bamboo plant does not flower or fruit, it’s lifespan is long and simple. And because it is hollow, bamboo also symbolizes an empty heart of humbleness. I love the fact that in western culture, lucky bamboo has also become a symbol for the green sustainability movement. Lucky bamboo is not technically bamboo, but it looks very similar, is super easy to take care of, and represents the same thing symbolically.
As a feng shui cure, it is usually placed in the entryway or the southwest corner of the room or establishment to strengthen the energy and flow of money. Jade plants can grow as an indoor or outdoor plant and ideally should be put in a location where they can get direct sunlight. Water them enough to keep their soil moist and regularly dust off their leaves. You can also add pebbles on top of their soil to facilitate the drainage of water.

Native to tropical Americas, Peace Lily is categorized under the plants family Araceae with scientific name Spathiphyllum, in Feng Shui it is considered as a fortune plant. Spathiphyllum is the super plant in terms of purifying the air, NASA Clean Air Study found that spathiphyllum cleans all types of environmental contaminants including benzene and formaldehyde. It lives best in shade and needs little bright light to thrive, and is watered approximately once a week.


In feng shui, lucky bamboo is ideal when it’s straight. Sometimes you see the curly or twisted versions, which actually represent the opposite of upright and positive growth, such as spinning and downward spiraling energy. I love using lucky bamboo for feng shui applications because they can thrive in a variety of lighting conditions, in water or in soil, and are easy to find.
When you’re setting up your room (or cubicle), you'll want to first look at its layout. Is there an even distribution of furniture on both sides of the room? Is there art only on one wall, or is it sprinkled throughout the space? Is it too bright? Is it too minimalist? How balanced and even do you feel in your workspace? Where and how do things feel off?
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